Rods, Built Cane.

I more-or-less like cane although not with any starry-eyed romanticism. I've owned a few cane rods and handled even more and it seems to me that for the most part there were more bad ones than good. I do think that 'good' rods have what some call 'the feel' and this is a kind of steely flex that one can only really experience, I can't fully describe it myself. A good example would be the Allcocks Superb below. I've held mine and the Woodsman's side-by-side and mine is a wand with a core of steel and his is less a wand and more a stick, although it does good service. It may be I've been amazingly lucky with the LRH No. 2 and the Octofloat and dreadfully unlucky with the MKIV. However, I'd argue that a material that varies so much by its very nature is the very definition of a 'poor material'.

It's certainly the case that a good cane rod has a 'feel' all of its own, some think it has soul, I prefer to think of it as a solid structure, that by its nature does not deform significantly when flexed and therefore has a restoring force that is a linear function of the deflection. You can call that a 'soul' if you like.

There's more rubbish and mystification surrounding cane rods than you see at a UFO convention. If I had thousand pounds for everyone who given me some variation of 'Woo-ooo, but that not the real MKIV taper...' along with 'the waving of the hands', I'd have made a profit on my last degree. Bamboo is grass and even subject to the whims of the maker and the process itself, a silk purse cannot be made out of a sow's ear, even a very fine sow's ear. It is what it is.

I've personally never believed the 'MKIV' was used to capture a 44lb record carp and there is enough mystification RDLI.e. a masking or covering up central aspects of historical truth through the promulgation of narratives sympathetic to the structural position of a social class or group are camouflaged so that these social structures and the state which assists in their reproduction, are seen as legitimate.
Like I said; 'woo-ooo' *waves hands in mysterious way*
 around the subject to give me grounds for thinking that, never mind the limitations of the rod itself and the availability of a much stouter rod (the MKIII), heresy for some. This in itself is interesting, but I'll write about that another time...

This space deliberately blankThis space deliberately blankGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeon (and return to the top of the page)Gonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonThis space deliberately blankThis space deliberately blank

Built-Cane Fishing Rod  The LRH No.3.

I picked this on the way back from a bad day. It was £60 and is a serious rod, with an estimated 3lb t/c. It had been built with agate rings all-through, which looked nice. Also, on using it for a bit of piking, I realised the set of the rod was at 45° to the ring alignment which gave it an odd feel. I decided to take off the agates, too heavy, too cracked. I put on some Hardy game guides, which are light, a jade butt-ring and an agate tip. Bottle green and maroon, reinforced whipping. There was also some plastic insulation tape on the corks, to jam the Hardy 'Screw-Lock' reel fittings. This had compressed the cork underneath and left sticky glue residue. I cleaned it off with white spirit and steamed out the dents, which worked better than I'd hoped.

It then looked good, but more importantly feels the biz. now and I planned to use it for the snaggy-margin carping with 14lb line. [first time out I hooked a 10-12lb fish and had to hold firm to stop a tree branch incident. The hook came away, what are the odds?].

I loved the long slender handle, the 'screw-locks' which allowed the reel-placement to make full use of the 9'6" and it was the first bit of cane I'd ever bought, but it spent too long rack'd, and...so Sold to the bloke at the back to Haydn in 2014. I prefer to sell to a user-angler at a good rate, I hope it catches fishes for him.

This space deliberately blankThis space deliberately blankAll tench are good tenchGonks, gobbies, gudgeon (and return to the top of the page)All tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchThis space deliberately blankThis space deliberately blank

Built-Cane Fishing Rod  The Chapman 500.

A 1960's vintage rod, according to Chapmans themselves, based on the label type. An auction-site bargain at £60, advertised with a loose ferrule, which turned out to be the male on the top section, which I slid off then araldited on. As straight as the proverbial arrow. There was still ferrule knock, the female on the middle section was loose on the cane, the glue having given up the ghost. I eased the brass off, cleaned it and the cane, put a few turns of thread onto the cane to center the ferrule, then used epoxy-resin to re-set it. All good.

I replaced the rings with Fuji SICs and used the ring spacing for the CH550Chapman 550, which entailed adding an extra ring to the rod. I removed the old rings and all the other whippings, removed any loose varnish then used thinned yatch varnish to seal the edges of the old varnish and any other cracks and then put a couple of careful coats over the top of the repaired sections to 'level' the varnish up. I left it as it was after that, waterproof and sound and whipped the new rings in the appropriate places, using a dark bottle-green thread and gave each whipping a light green border. How does it fish though, this is what I want to know.

Later in the year, the 550Chapman 550 with low Bells guides made me smile, so I re-ringed the Chapman 500 with low Bells and a clear agate stand-off butt ring taken from an old Scottie spinning rod and an agate tip, improving the feel. The 'Jammy Bender', which I liked a lot, was, through lack of use, passed to a very good home in 2011 Sold to the bloke at the back and was someone's first cane rod, they could scarcly have done better. I occasionally miss it, a very good rod.

This space deliberately blankThis space deliberately blankGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeon (and return to the top of the page)Gonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonThis space deliberately blankThis space deliberately blank

Built-Cane Fishing Rod  The Chapman 550.

I'd yearned for cane for a bit so ordered a blank in December 2007 ("550 Blank, not impregnated, medium flame colour and bronze ferrules fitted. Handle, with reel fittings/rings"), inluenced by the convenience of three-piece. It took me four outings on a new water to Christen it, but eventually I had a brace of 10lb commons and a couple of 5lb ghosties. Now I see why some prefer it for playing fishing. Having said all that I never really took to it. I bumped off a lot of tench, it seemed very stiff and the ferrules were a bu88er to get apart.

After some time on the rack, I took of the Fuji rings and whipped on, using garnet and bottle-green threads, low Bells, an agate butt ring and a white agate Hardy tulip tip-ring. It looked vey pretty then and even fished OK. In March 2009 Chapmans made me a tip section (54" Custom made tip section for Chapman 550 at 1-1/4 lbs t/c) to make up a 'combo' type of rod. It was a beautiful thing but the first time I took it out, the tip dragged on the roof of the car and the top 5" snapped clean off, like it was a candy-cane. I returned it to them but never followed up for one reason or another. In the end another rod which was racked so long I Sold to the bloke at the back it on to what appeared to be a reasonable home.

Other relevant Chapman 550 entries:

Built-Cane Fishing Rod 13th April 2008. Today my Chapman 550 blank arrived in the post. It's clean, unvarnished and a quick exchange of emails with 'John' established the guides are to wrapped on the same side as the ferrule punch-marks. OK then.

Built-Cane Fishing Rod 10th August 2009. I've not really got on with my 550Chapman 550, a new blank I bought last year and then built myself, with its two tone green whipping an Fuji rings (I know, I know). Two options then. Strip it and sell the blank. Or, I eventually decide, as I have an agate butt ring and Hardy white agate tulip tip (off the LRH No.3Which was, by the way, the first cane rod I ever owned), I get some traditional wire cradle guides and rebuild the rod in maroon with some bottle green trim and rings that seem to look better. Fish will tell if it's a successful transformation.

This space deliberately blankThis space deliberately blankThymallus thymallusHard to find, easy to hook, hard to keep on the hook...(and back to the top of the page)Thymallus thymallusHard to find, easy to hook, hard to keep on the hookThymallus thymallusHard to find, easy to hook, hard to keep on the hookThymallus thymallusHard to find, easy to hook, hard to keep on the hookThymallus thymallusHard to find, easy to hook, hard to keep on the hookThymallus thymallusHard to find, easy to hook, hard to keep on the hookThymallus thymallusHard to find, easy to hook, hard to keep on the hookThymallus thymallusHard to find, easy to hook, hard to keep on the hookThymallus thymallusHard to find, easy to hook, hard to keep on the hookThymallus thymallusHard to find, easy to hook, hard to keep on the hookThymallus thymallusHard to find, easy to hook, hard to keep on the hookThymallus thymallusHard to find, easy to hook, hard to keep on the hookThymallus thymallusHard to find, easy to hook, hard to keep on the hookThymallus thymallusHard to find, easy to hook, hard to keep on the hookThymallus thymallusHard to find, easy to hook, hard to keep on the hookThymallus thymallusHard to find, easy to hook, hard to keep on the hookThymallus thymallusHard to find, easy to hook, hard to keep on the hookThymallus thymallusHard to find, easy to hook, hard to keep on the hookThymallus thymallusHard to find, easy to hook, hard to keep on the hookThymallus thymallusHard to find, easy to hook, hard to keep on the hookThymallus thymallusHard to find, easy to hook, hard to keep on the hookThymallus thymallusHard to find, easy to hook, hard to keep on the hookThis space deliberately blankThis space deliberately blank

Built-Cane Fishing Rod  The 'A bit like a Chapman 700' rod.

I acquired what appeared to be a reconditioned Dennis Pye, 4lb t/c (!) nuts, but I rather liked it. It turned out it had the wrong tapers so not a Dennis Pye. Despite my affection for it, it never got used and was Sold to the bloke at the back to the same good home as the Chapman 500, which is good to know.

This space deliberately blankThis space deliberately blankGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeon (and return to the top of the page)Gonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonThis space deliberately blankThis space deliberately blank

Built-Cane Fishing Rod  The B. James MK IV

I acquired a B. James MK IV, late 1950's vintage, which was, frankly, a dog. The original reel-bands were missing, replaced with two brass ones I had to snip off, to avoid damaging the cork. The butt thimble was "uhu'd" on, and it came away without damage when I put in a very long 3/8" bsf thread. The butt-button was badly perished. The second ring on the bottom section was not original and corroded, whipped on with D grade cotton, and the varnish over the top made the colour run from three intermediate whippings either side. The top section had a set against the rings and a bit of a dog-leg near the tip.

A closer look showed the rings on the top section had been removed, the rod turned around and re-whipped by a blind spider. So I removed all of them, cleaned back the varnish to the cane and re-whipped temporarily in bottle-green. This included gluing on the tip-ring, which hadn't been. Slightest of knocks on the ferrule nothing candle-wax won't make fishable. A charitable view owuld be it's a 'project'.

I cleaned the butt thimble, got hold of some reel bands and a rubber button for the end. I let in the cane at the butt very slightly (I can hear the sharp intakes of breath around the world) to prevent the thread on the button or a spear (I have a few, I use them) pushing off the thimble at a later date. The cork was restored with five minutes of a plastic pan scourer and washing up liquid, more or less pristine, then lightly steam to remove any compressed areas. No cork removed. It's managed a couple of double figure carp, although the 16lb'er made it bend alarmingly. Sold to the bloke at the back it on rr...to a 'rod-restorer', who insulted me by doing some fast adding up and taking away to try and confuse me, in respect of a rod-ring I'd had poorly repaired by the same.
(1) I can add up and take away really fast and
(2) even if they'd made an extra fiver ('no'), I never used said restorer again for anything. Ever. Never will either. Plus I've put the word about. Well you would wouldn't you?
.

I found it to be a horrible rod, too soft, no spine, not at all the feted legendary rod . I'm told by one who knows better than me that the cane quality is everything, but for me, this rod was not worth what I spent on it. Plus, the 'mate' who cheekily sold me a complete dog, is not my definition of a 'mate', but it's just as well to find that out.

This space deliberately blankThis space deliberately blankThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are crucians (and return to the top of the page)The pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThis space deliberately blankThis space deliberately blank

Built-Cane Fishing Rod  J. S. Sharpe 9ft Spinning Rod.

A really nice light little rod, only used a few times by one of the Littleanglers on a mass outing. Sold to the bloke at the back for what I paid for it, seems a pity, but it was probably never going to be used.

This space deliberately blankThis space deliberately blankGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeon (and return to the top of the page)Gonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonGonk, gobby, gudgeonGonks, gobbies, gudgeonThis space deliberately blankThis space deliberately blank

Built-Cane Fishing Rod  The Hardy LRH No.2 9'6" Salmon Rod

I bought this in 2010 as it was known to be a 'useful' carp rod. It had clear agates all the way up and a wire butt-ring which was odd, but still. One of the clear agate intermediate rings was cracked so I passed it onto a rod-restorer to get a 'proper job' on it. I had to chase it endlessly to get it back and in the end, well, I can do better myself and it was just as if one of the other rings was now cracked. I'm not doing that again.

I changed the 'new' cracked one in annoyance, then put the rod on the wall. Two years later I got it down, put Low 'Bells' on the top section on the opposite face - the rod had a 'set' and 'agates' are heavy and possibly are not really required. I then used it to catch five carp to 9lb, two very feisty pike in the 4-5lb range and a gaggle of 'pasties'. It's rather nice, easy but powerful. The reel-seat could do with being 5" nearer the butt though. Fish over 6lb only I'd say. Strike hard...best with a 'pin and fish close in.

I miss it. I'd like another, a good one, with fully sliding reel-bands, so I can place the reel to make best use of the length, plus I'd fit titanium rings. I think it would be even better then. Sold to the bloke at the back to Haydn, always better to see a rod used.

This space deliberately blankThis space deliberately blankAll tench are good tenchGonks, gobbies, gudgeon (and return to the top of the page)All tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchThis space deliberately blankThis space deliberately blank

Built-Cane Fishing Rod  The 9'8" Mystery Rod'

A rod which I re-built from an old nameless salmon rod, the best guess a MARCO salmon wormer, which took a 9lb, two 10lb carp and a 4lb tench on its first try-out. Stripped of its crumbling corks and cracked black/gold jasper, I fitted an agate stand-off butt-ring, 'low Bells' guides and a red agate tip ring. The new corks gained a sliding reel-seat and I refitted the brass butt-cap, with a 3/8" thread, into which is screwed the original outlandishly large rubber button. It's stout, about the same at the tip as an LRH No.2, but with a steeper taper and will do very well for silly piking. Anyway, used much or not, I like it. Still hanging on the wall waiting for something.

The Mystery Salmon Spinning RodThe whole rod, end-to-end. It's a nice colour.
The Mystery Salmon Spinning Rod The butt and the male ferrule The Mystery Salmon Spinning Rod The butt and the male ferrule The Mystery Salmon Spinning Rod One of the 'low Bells'
The Mystery Salmon Spinning Rod The sliding reel-seat and one of the tip-section rings The Mystery Salmon Spinning Rod The tiny 'low Bells' keeper-ring and the date The Mystery Salmon Spinning Rod The rather fine butt-ring
The Mystery Salmon Spinning Rod The female ferrule and the tip-ring The Mystery Salmon Spinning Rod The female ferrule and the tip-ring The Mystery Salmon Spinning Rod Another view of the keeper-ring
The Mystery Salmon Spinning Rod Video et Taceo; 'I see and keep silent', the motto of Queen Elizabeth I of England. The Mystery Salmon Spinning Rod The sliding reel-seat and one of the tip-section rings

You might have spotted the double locking nut on the reel-seat. This original rod had a fixed aluminium reel-seat, and its sole locking nut fitted the new sliding one, so I added it on. The handle was sanded using the 'half-pipe cut length-ways' method and is a pretty decent job even if I do say so myself. The reel-seat moves but is a 'working-fit' so it's unlikey to come loose during use.

The ferrule is the one which the rod came with. It's still very tight; I've not even had to run over it with the modified pipe-cutter. It's also worth noting that the cane under the original corks, especially the last foot, was the most appalling workmanship. The strips were oddly shaped and badly glued. But, hidden as they were, under the cork, who would ever know? The tip-ring looks nice but the agate is a tiny bit loose, so there is something of a tiny rattling noise, but I'll super-glue it one of these days, plus the cork is not quite right where it enters the butt-cap. I'll probably fix that one day as well.

This space deliberately blankThis space deliberately blankThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are crucians (and return to the top of the page)The pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThis space deliberately blankThis space deliberately blank

Built-Cane Fishing Rod  Edgar Sealy Octofloat, 11ft.

An auction site surprise at £26.30, possibly because it was advertised as a "Sealey vintage split cane fishing rod". The only work I did on it, was to replace the thicker than 'D' grade thread on the top-section whippings for 'A' grade garnet, although I took the trouble to rotate the rings to the other side of the top-section while I was at it. I'm sure it took 1oz off the weight. First time out I landed a 13lb carp on 4lb line. Surprising rod.

After over two years 'on the rack', I Sold to the bloke at the back this rod on for a decent profit, although to be fair, I'd re-whipped it. Another rod that would be better with titanium rings.

I nabbed another one cheap in April 2012, but it was beyond hope, with twists in the cane that were beyond mine and another's wit to straighten. Even Sold to the bloke at the back as such, it was taken up by someone, presumably an optimist.

Other Octofloat entries:

Built-Cane Fishing Rod 13th June 2011. Bu88er. An hour to strip the broken rings and old varnish, four hours straightening the tip with a hot air gun, an hour whipping the rings on, just the tip to go, then varnish today, tomorrow, good for the 16th...and the arm of the tip ring snaps clean off. Rats. This Octofloat has been severely bent, the ferrules even seem to have a set. It's usable, but not without some rotation of the sections to offset the kinks. Perhaps a restoration too far. On the rack for now. OCT...where it remained. Even Nobbington-Smythe couldn't sort it out. Bent and twisted to heck. Sold on as a 'bare blank' to soemone who though they might be able to fix it. Good luck!

This space deliberately blankThis space deliberately blankThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are crucians (and return to the top of the page)The pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThe pieces of gold that are cruciansThis space deliberately blankThis space deliberately blank

Built-Cane Fishing Rod  The 'Gudgeonator'.

I found a little #4 weight fly-rod at a Dorchester boot-sale. £20, delaminated for 4-5" above the ferrule. It hung neglected on my wall for a year then, barring the male ferrule on the top joint which I cut off and dug out, hardly slashing my fingers at all GuAOr, more positively, 'the rod took the blood sacrifice it required' .

Mixed the cascemite, bound the split, peeled off the varnish. At the top end, perhaps 6" in, the slightest thickening, a loupe exposed the deftest of repairs. Huh. Stripped butt section, cut off the corks, cut the cane through just above the reel seat with a hacksaw - I dug the cork out from around the tube with a variety of pointy things, while watching some 'period mystery' and drilled out the 3/8" BSF thread on the bottom. A short handle was planned, two floor grade 4" lengths and a champagne cork half bored, the re-used reel seat, two more champers corks.

With the butt sawn down, I was going cut the tip down the 4". First I fitted the ferrule, the slightest of rubs with sandpaper and it slid on - I varnished both pieces of cane with half-and half to seal them, then mixed Araldite rapid and fitted the counter - a closed end counter I had to work the metal back and forth until the air popped out, then bound the tangs flat with cable ties. Funny thing, when dry it had bulged the metal a few thou as the picture shows from where I worked it in - to give it a waggle. As thought, a little over-waggly, so off came the tip. Varnished both sections 'full strength'.

[I know it's not always 'done', but I seal my bare cane with thinned varnish and give it one coat of full strength before fitting bits. Nearly all the cane water damage I've seen is around the whipping and fittings, which crack and under them is bare cane. You get the idea - never mind that nice porous cork gently getting damp with cane under it...]

The 'Gudgeonator' ProjectThe 'Gudgeonator' Project
Reel seat, cut off...1
The 'Gudgeonator' ProjectThe 'Gudgeonator' Project
The cane at the thick end...2
The 'Gudgeonator' ProjectThe 'Gudgeonator' Project
Female ferrule...3
The 'Gudgeonator' ProjectThe 'Gudgeonator' Project
The corks and the reel seat...4
The 'Gudgeonator' ProjectThe 'Gudgeonator' Project
The counter removed (blood not shown)...5
The 'Gudgeonator' ProjectThe 'Gudgeonator' Project
The champagne cork butt-cap (and a nice tin)...6
The 'Gudgeonator' ProjectThe 'Gudgeonator' Project
The corks and the reel seat...7
The 'Gudgeonator' ProjectThe 'Gudgeonator' Project
The butt-cap glued on...8
The 'Gudgeonator' ProjectThe 'Gudgeonator' Project
The handle under construction...9
The 'Gudgeonator' ProjectThe 'Gudgeonator' Project
The handle under construction...10
The 'Gudgeonator' ProjectThe 'Gudgeonator' Project
The handle under construction...11
The 'Gudgeonator' ProjectThe 'Gudgeonator' Project
The 'Avon Gypsy'...12

The rod, as acquired, was black trimmed, fine it looked, so I kept that idea. What rings? This is a slight rod, a 1lb chub might test it hard, brook rod or no and I wanted no more weight. In the end I went for the eyes it came with, the snakes, closed them up ever so slightly, and trimmed off any extra metal I judged they did not need. The tip was a fine little agate I have no memory of getting - the rod's original a white agate, cute, but chipped, such a pity, the butt ring is a small amber agate off a Hardy rod, long gone.

I whipped over the ferrule tangs and sealed with half-and-half. A nice colleague bored my Champers corks on a handy lathe two through for the fore-grip and one blind-drilled for the butt end. Glued on, a few turns of thread for the glue first. The real seat I set with gaffer tape strip built up - I hot melted the bottom end generously and piled it onto the cork and held it down until the glue cooled, then filled the other end with the same stuff (tip, don't get liquid hot melt on your fingers, it burns and rips the skin off when you pull it away). Two more corks and glue. Some sanding to even things up, but a bare minimum. It's not a show pony and it's fun to leave the corks showing their origin.

Such a tiny rod, for small streams and small fish needed a small reel - I give you an 'Avon Gypsy' from Romsey Tackle Fair. Perfect. Now for the fish.

P.S. I used it once for a dart at some small rudd and tench, the snake eyes don't really work at all with mono. I replaced them with some tiny single leg eyes.

This space deliberately blankThis space deliberately blankAll tench are good tenchGonks, gobbies, gudgeon (and return to the top of the page)All tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchThis space deliberately blankThis space deliberately blank

Built-Cane Fishing Rod  The Allcock's 'Superb' MT4"May the Fourth be with you". Well, it makes me smile... .

This cost me £20 at boot-sale, blissfully unaware at the time of it's comparative rarity, but I liked it. The cane was fletched-straight, but the ferrule was worn past redemption. So I replaced the ferrule and took off the 'sea rod' rings, which some say are 'authentic', although I prefer to say 'rubbish'. They were rust-pitted for the most part and the tip ring was broken. I replaced them with Pacbay Minimas and added a Hardlon Stripping guide butt-ring. This reduced the weight on the top section. The female ferrule isn't 100% straight but it wasn't before...the cane under it was rounded slightly off-centre. I left it as was. I've had carp to 12lb on 6lb line with it and it's very steely. It has, as they say, 'the feel'.

It does however, have a 31" handle, far too long and fat. So I'll probably remove 8" and sand the rest down to ¾" and add decent sliding reel-bands. I'll let you know. The Woodsman' has one, with its awful original rings and mine is much the stronger rod. Odd. That's cane for you. In any event with a new ferrule and nice light modern (chrome/titanium) rings, 'twill be a joy to use.

The Allcocks SuperbThe Allcocks Superb
The rod...1
The Allcocks SuperbThe Allcocks Superb
The label...2
The Allcocks SuperbThe Allcocks Superb
The handle...3
The Allcocks SuperbThe Allcocks Superb
The handle...4
The Allcocks SuperbThe Allcocks Superb
The handle...5
The Allcocks SuperbThe Allcocks Superb
The butt ring...1
The Allcocks SuperbThe Allcocks Superb
The female ferrule...2
The Allcocks SuperbThe Allcocks Superb
The rather worn 'counter'...3
The Allcocks SuperbThe Allcocks Superb
The cracked tip ring...4
The Allcocks SuperbThe Allcocks Superb
The ferrules removed...5
The Allcocks SuperbThe Allcocks Superb
The old ferrules...6

The original rings, removed weighed 0.6oz, of which 0.4oz was on the tip section. The new set, which included a lined Hardlon butt ring (0.15oz), was 0.3oz total. With a wild cry of "Try getting outside more, tackle collectors." I removed the old rings...

This space deliberately blankThis space deliberately blankAll tench are good tenchGonks, gobbies, gudgeon (and return to the top of the page)All tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchThis space deliberately blankThis space deliberately blank

Built-Cane Fishing Rod  The 'Allcock's Perfect' Project #1.

I picked up Allcocks 'Perfect' (20 quid) a year back, it's dead straight, 9' on the nose a terrific honey colour. The butt-ring is missing and the real seat is set well down the butt - an old salmon spinner. It was, Nobbyngton-Smythe reckons, Allcocks most expensive rod ever...

So...my plan is to strip it...make a butt section, something a bit like a Chapman's handle, two feet long dowel, or something fairly rigid, and turn it into a 10'6" or 10'8" carp rod... 10As I'm already fairly sure that I'm not going to Heaven, I'll risk it.

The Allcocks' PerfectThe Allcocks' Perfect
The tip...1
The Allcocks' PerfectThe Allcocks' Perfect
a middle bit...2
The Allcocks' PerfectThe Allcocks' Perfect
a middle bit...3
The Allcocks' PerfectThe Allcocks' Perfect
a middle bit...4
The Allcocks' PerfectThe Allcocks' Perfect
a middle bit...5
The Allcocks' PerfectThe Allcocks' Perfect
a middle bit...6
The Allcocks' PerfectThe Allcocks' Perfect
a middle bit...7
The Allcocks' PerfectThe Allcocks' Perfect
a middle bit...8
The Allcocks' PerfectThe Allcocks' Perfect
a middle bit...9
The Allcocks' PerfectThe Allcocks' Perfect
The butt...10

The other entries on the 'Beastmaster'.

Built-Cane Fishing Rod 23rd March 2015. The 'Allcock's Perfect' Project #2. I removed the corks, not so hard, found water damage, not serious, but this is why one might consider varnish before corks go on, discovered the reel-seat was plastic, tacked on through a box-wood cylinder, the lower cane still with its outer shell on. There's a big nick out of the cane just up from the reel seat. That's going to bug me, the rings are going on the opposite side to the old, so the nick is going to be on the underneath of the rod - it's unlike to matter much, but I'll epoxy/dyneema it anyway. A lot of careful scraping was required to get the mixture of glue, string and gunk of the section under the handle - which was rough in places.

The ferrule and counter came off easily enough, the female on the butt section cut off flush with the cane, then a steep spiral cut with a hacksaw - one must be careful doing this, the idea is to cut a gentle spiral up from the open end until the brass is paper thin - work around and up the ferrule until the cut is nearly at the 'cane end'. It pays to cover the last few inches of cane with gaffer tape first, so avoid damaging the cane if the saw catches. Optionally, gaffer tape your fingers as well...

Insert a flat blade screwdriver into the slot cut at the 'open' end and twist it gently, the brass should open up, tearing any last layer of brass - if you've cut it thin enough. With a pair of pliers, you can usually 'unwind' the ferrule until the last bit can be slid off. Be gentle, use the saw to ease open parts of the cut which are not quite deep enough. Next time I'll post pictures on how to do this...look at this - the cane under the female ferrule. You can just see where cane flats have been glued on and turned down. The counter end has been rounded as well, but is back to whole hex section cane before it gets to the ferrule 'exit', so no loss of cane at the critical points.

The Allcocks' PerfectThe Allcocks' Perfect
'nick'...(1)
The Allcocks' PerfectThe Allcocks' Perfect
'nick'...(2)
The Allcocks' PerfectThe Allcocks' Perfect
glue line/water damage?...(3)
The Allcocks' PerfectThe Allcocks' Perfect
glue line/water damage?...(4)
The Allcocks' PerfectThe Allcocks' Perfect
'nick'...(5)
The Allcocks' PerfectThe Allcocks' Perfect
'big nick'...(6)
The Allcocks' PerfectThe Allcocks' Perfect
Reel seat pin hole - another on the other side...(7)
The Allcocks' PerfectThe Allcocks' Perfect
Ferrule pin, to be filed flat...(8)
The Allcocks' PerfectThe Allcocks' Perfect
Ringstead beach on a nice March day...'just because'...(9)

I've cut away the varnish on either side of the logo to keep it on the cane. For the handle I've cut a two foot piece of cane from the butt of an old 'Black Seal' rod, a terrible thing (but cheap...). This is 15mm across the flats at the thick end, so will use it to make a butt section with a 'reverse' taper, not that I think it will bend at all. This will be strong, heavy enough and slender enough for me to get corks down to 20mm for 'Lockfast' reel bands...that's the plan.

The real shock was to find water damage on the top section just past the second ring. There were a few black marks under the varnish but one of them had the tell-tall black line along a joint and I despaired briefly. I gave the section a good bending and it was 'quiet' no creaks and 'tik-tik' noises, but nevertheless its existence gnaws away like a loft-mouse in the night, so I used a two-part epoxy and reinforced these areas with some grey 6lb dyneema and brushed a little more resin into the thread. I'm pondering black whippings, I like how the look on cane (since owning a sadly, un-straightenable Octofloat in black thread) with perhaps a few turns of green wire on the thick ones. Hm... Ferrules ordered from the truly helpful Ted Oliver, still the best quality.

Once the ferrules arrive I'll order cork, rings and thread.

Built-Cane Fishing Rod 10th April 2015. The 'Allcock's Perfect' Project #3. The top section had multiple deep nicks across the flats where every silk whipping had been cut off. Careless and crude. Resolving to put reinforcing over all the nicks along with the two areas where water damage showed and using a two part epoxy, a tack layer was applied between 5mm pencilled markers and then whipped over with 6lb dyneema, brushing more epoxy over the whipping. Horrible job and my first thought was it would be unmanageably lumpy (it's not really) and a tad ugly (it is). Unable to reconcile myself with this, it didn't look good or 'right', and taking RedFin's advice, ordered some white silk thread to re-do in silk. Once varnished the whippings will almost fade into the cane. So a happy hour cutting off the first go and scraping off the epoxy came ot pass, then the cane got a coat of thinned varnish, while the silk was in the post...

Also the ferrules; They came, fine solid things, the smaller pair fitted the cane almost to the mil, the larger needed some work...investigating the lathe at the work-shop it was clear the cane was 'too long' to build up and machine down. Both sections of cane needed some work, the bottom end of the Allcocks' needed just the corners off really and that barely (I took 4¼" inches off the bottom end, it was rough on the outer layers - although mighty tough to cut - and the nail holes from the original reel seat bothered me, those ought to be well inside the counter's brass embrace.

The handle section, the late not lamented Black Seal, needed work. Decided to use the same technique used for cutting cork handles down, i.e. 30mm plastic drainpipe sawed in half lengthways used as a sanding former. If this didn't work well, the duff bit could be cut off. By rotating the cane in my left hand at a steady rate and cutting in short strokes (stop it) back and forth at a constant rate with my other hand, while regularly offering it up to the female for size(I said stop it), it was quite easy to maintain a true and even cut. I discovered twisting the ferrule hard left black marks on the cane, so using this as ersatz 'engineer's black', worked steadily until a 'working fit' was achieved, then gave the cane a few a few gentle strokes (...come on!) with a finer grade. Time elapsed about 30 minutes. 'By eye' it's not possible to see if 'true' or not, so probably 'not'. Huh. Not so hard.

Repeating the sanding exercise, after cutting the lower end of the Allock's off, took only 10 minutes to fit the ferrule - this was very nearly a fit 'out of the box'. Again, 'true'. Measuring the total length with the rod laid out on the floor, with a 24" handle and an inch off the tip (Oi! Really...) - which was bevelled for the original tip ring - it comes in at 10' 8". The ferrules' feathered edges were removed with a jewellers file...so annoying when the whipping frays here...and then also coloured in the bright brass with a black indelible marker - with black thread over the top, there'll be not a glint.

One other thing. The butt section was hollow - sort of - perhaps eight inches deep, this was filled with epoxy and carbon rods.

Built-Cane Fishing Rod 16th April 2015. The 'Allcock's Perfect' Project #4. Having decided to whip the rod in black thread, on a whim, I decided to use some green wire to give the ferrule whipping some muted bling. The whipping over the ferrule was done using a 'C' grade black thread, with an overlay of '0.16mm/0.006"/AWG 34' bobbin wire, with a green enamel coat. They're strictly decorative, which is to say, not there to add strength.

'Twas like this; cast the whipping on, after three turns put a 'pull through' loop under the thread and do three more turns, then flip the loop back out of the way and whip up to about six turns from the 'cast off' point, then whip a backward loop (facing the opposite way from the 'cast off' loop) for three of those turns and finish the whipping in the usual way. Keep the whipping turns tight together.

Then use the first loop to pull the end of the wire through to start it off. Whip the wire on top of the thread whipping following the grooves between the threads, the first turn is critical. When you get to the second loop, pull the wire through to finish. The line used for this needs to be stout - the wire is hard to pull through and using 6lb dyneema, the wire will break at the pull through as often as not (which is OK as long as it's tucked under OK).

Thinned varnish is then applied; make sure it soaks in between the wire turns. They'll get another coat or two of undiluted 'yacht' later. You can see a few places where the wire whipping varies a little, the thread itself varies slightly, there's not much to do about that, but it looks fine for one who is 'less than a perfectionist'.

You may have realised by now, that as a rod, this might be something of an animal...my original idea was to produce something like a 'MK III' but a shade longer than 10', but less than 11'. While on the face of it it would have made a nice 9' rod, I find that too short for practical general carp fishing and my experince of 11' cane rods is that they are mostly a little over long.

Built-Cane Fishing Rod 22nd April 2015. The 'Allcock's Perfect' Project #5. I have now whipped over all the top section iffy bits with white silk thread and varnished. It's a swine to pull though and cut without wisps of silk remaining...however...I finally cut the tip down 1", then assembling the rod in its bare state I measured the overall length at 10' 8" and cut the butt section at that length (allowing for ¼" wear on each ferrule). Once cut down, took it outside to play and the first proper waggle was a surprise. It's not as heavy as I expected and has 'the feel', very much so. Heh. Here carpy carpy...

The next job is to form the handle. I've opted for a champagne front cork (for fun), bevelled a little on the inside, then a section for the 'Lockfasts' some 12", which I'll glue on and sand down in isolation. Then I'll place cork over the rest of the butt, finishing the butt end with another champers cork. This amuses me, but also the cork is very good quality...

Here are the rings. The butt ring is a game guide, but the others are Pacbay titanium and a Fuji titanium tip ring. I did this as they look OK, they are very very light, not a bad thing and lastly, in the case of the tip ring which needed at least a 3.6mm tube diameter. It's a heavy piece of cane. The tip was 'gun smoke' when it turned up, I may have wire brushed it a bit to match the others better...

This space deliberately blankThis space deliberately blankAll tench are good tenchGonks, gobbies, gudgeon (and return to the top of the page)All tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchAll tench are good tenchThis space deliberately blankThis space deliberately blank

Built-Cane Fishing Rod  The 'MK III'; Part 1.

A tube arrived today with a cane rod-blank in it...I've always wanted an actual 'MK III'. That is, the Richard Walker double-built cane carp rod, a 10 foot two-piece compound of two straight tapers. In his own words "Of course it was designed for fish of 10lb and upwards..." ('Drop Me A Line' p.198). I always fancied, notwithstanding 'the narrative', that this rod was the more likely conqueror of the 44lb record, although I can't substantiate that. But it has always intrigued and over the course of a long set of sporadic emails, the idea was born and an offer was made. The tapers for this rod are on Page 27 of Drop Me a Line, and these technically, make the rod a compound taper, the top and bottom sections having different tapers. On the opposite page (p.26) there is a ring spacing, which I may or may not use. Here it is:

The Richard Walker MKIII Carp RodThe whole blank in the string
The Richard Walker MKIII Carp Rod The thick end of the butt section, show casing the double-built cane The Richard Walker MKIII Carp Rod The Tapers The Richard Walker MKIII Carp Rod The thin end of the butt section and the thick end of the tip section, the double-built cane clearly visible.
The Richard Walker MKIII Carp Rod A wider shot of the blank's ends The Richard Walker MKIII Carp Rod A wider shot of the blank's ends

The blank itself has a slightest odour of charring, perhaps a slight smell of treacle, and on the ends the double-build can clearly be seen. The tip section has been left a trifle longer than 60" to allow for the fitting of a tip ring. The first order of the day is to lay it on a flat surface to work out which face the rings will end up on. Once marked (pencil), I'll then varnish it once to seal the cane, while I seek out a good quality reinforced ferrule. Once the ferrule is on, and a little time has passed, then I will give the whole thing a waggle or two and consider my next move. I have no set date for completion - it will be built bit by bit and if it's not ready until September, then it's not. But where to try it out? Now that is a question.

So, here is the ongoing MKIII build...

Built-Cane Fishing Rod 16th January 2018. The 'MK III'; Part 1.

A tube arrived today with a cane rod-blank in it...I've always wanted an actual 'MK III'. That is, the Richard Walker double-built cane carp rod, a 10 foot two-piece compound of two straight tapers. In his own words "Of course it was designed for fish of 10lb and upwards..." ('Drop Me A Line' p.198). I always fancied, notwithstanding 'the narrative', that this rod was the more likely conqueror of the 44lb record, although I can't substantiate that. But it has always intrigued and over the course of a long set of sporadic emails, the idea was born and an offer was made. The tapers for this rod are on Page 27 of Drop Me a Line, and these technically, make the rod a compound taper, the top and bottom sections having different tapers. On the opposite page (p.26) there is a ring spacing, which I may or may not use. Here it is:

The Richard Walker MKIII Carp RodThe whole blank in the string
The Richard Walker MKIII Carp Rod The thick end of the butt section, show casing the double-built cane The Richard Walker MKIII Carp Rod The Tapers The Richard Walker MKIII Carp Rod The thin end of the butt section and the thick end of the tip section, the double-built cane clearly visible.
The Richard Walker MKIII Carp Rod A wider shot of the blank's ends The Richard Walker MKIII Carp Rod A wider shot of the blank's ends

The blank itself has a slightest odour of charring, perhaps a slight smell of treacle, and on the ends the double-build can clearly be seen. The tip section has been left a trifle longer than 60" to allow for the fitting of a tip ring. The first order of the day is to lay it on a flat surface to work out which face the rings will end up on. Once marked (pencil), I'll then varnish it once to seal the cane, while I seek out a good quality reinforced ferrule. Once the ferrule is on, and a little time has passed, then I will give the whole thing a waggle or two and consider my next move. I have no set date for completion - it will be built bit by bit and if it's not ready until September, then it's not. But where to try it out? Now that is a question.

So, here is the ongoing MKIII build...

Built-Cane Fishing Rod 23rd March 2018. Post. Two things arrived in the post today. Firstly, a set of finest bronzed reinforced barrel ferrules for the MKIII project. These, after some too-ing and fro-ing with the always helpful Ted Oliver, turned out to be a spot-on fit. Item two, my Harlow Reel number two. Yeah...

The MKIII rod's ferrulesThe perfectly proper bronzed reinforced barrel ferrule for the MKIII.
Harlow Center PinMy second Harlow...now I need a spacer for the reelseat...
The Lady of the StreamThe Lady of the Stream...(and back to the top of the page) Thymallus ThymallusThymallus Thymallus The Lady of the StreamThe Lady of the Stream Thymallus Thymallusgrayling The Lady of the StreamThe Lady of the Stream Thymallus ThymallusThymallus Thymallus The Lady of the Streamgrayling Thymallus ThymallusThymallus Thymallus

In Summary

The observant and numerate reader can work out that I've owned, and/or built 14 built-cane rods, and I've sold or parted with nine of them.

I've built several up from blanks, and repaired and fettled others. I've replaced ferrules, rings, butt-caps, whippings, glued up delaminated sections and done almost anything else you can think of in the name of making a cane rod into a user.

03:36am on 2018-04-22 JAA