Knots and Line

I've mentioned the knot obsession elsewhere; this is where I expound upon it. In general, if you have a knot between you and the fish it is, or should be, the weakest link in your tackle. There is no such thing as a knot that truly has 100% of the line strength, wet or dry. It follows that it pays to keep the number of knots to a minimum and also to ensure you use the best knot for the job, tied correctly.

One of the most annoying phrases used regarding knots is "It's never let me downRational Empiricists of the world will unite, if the evidence supports the hypothesis.". While I understand very well how trust in an item can make a difference to one's day and fishing, the laws of physics give few figs indeed for what one believes.

I generally work on the basis that the optimum number of knots is 'one'. The one attaching the hook. Lots of people prefer to have a weak link at the trace end, which I can understand in principle, but I prefer to put my effort into never losing a fish in the first place. In fact, if the escape of the fish with minimal encumbrance matters so much, just use a really terrible hook-knot. Test a selection and use the worst consistent one. There you go.

This seems the right place to jot down some thoughts on line; why I use the type of lines I do and how I see the advantages and disadvantages. Likewise braid traces and how I avoid buying 'special' hook-link braid, about which I will only say that the market might support a 'Dick Turpin' brand, if only to put the others into proper perspective. You'll further notice there is no discussion of fluorocarbon line.

I pour further scorn and derision on any line labelled 'double-strength' or 'extra-strength'. I have some 'double-strength' 6lb line, the spool is labelled '12lb'.

How can you not like perch bobbers...?How can you not like perch bobbers? ?(and back to the top of the page) How can you not like perch bobbers...?How can you not like perch bobbers...? How can you not like perch bobbers...?How can you not like perch bobbers...? How can you not like perch bobbers...?How can you not like perch bobbers...? How can you not like perch bobbers...?How can you not like perch bobbers...? How can you not like perch bobbers...?How can you not like perch bobbers...? How can you not like perch bobbers...?How can you not like perch bobbers...? How can you not like perch bobbers...?How can you not like perch bobbers...?

Fettling Fishing Tackle  Some Thoughts on Fishing Line.

I used Bayer Perlon for years, as it was a good reliable line and 'Richard Walker said it was', which was good enough at the time. I still have some oddments of it, but have used and liked Maxima (Maxima chamelon was ubiquitous in Cyprus with its cuckoo-wrasse colours). In around 2005 I came across Stren Original 6lb 'Original Clear Blue'. This was on offer somewhere or other, so was an experiment. It's fairly limp, un-stretched and fluoresces blue in daylight although clear in the water. Conseqeuntly it's easy to see where the line is, which is useful and also easy to spot any left behind, which is also good.

Having said that, I bought some 'clear' as the 'Blue' was jolly bright and after a six month trial in 2005-6 have taken on 8lb and 10lb Stren Original which I use on my 'Kingpin'. I'm pretty convinced it's the best unstretched mono line I've ever used. It's not quite as limp as Maxima, but it's tough line - dragging it through trees doesn't scuff up the surface, unlike one or two 'higher profile' carp lines and the knot stregnth is excellent also. It's downside is that it can be hard to find in the UK, but Basspro, 'anytown', USA will ship.

I use un-stretched mono main-line for the majority of my fishing. Bearing in mind I seldom cast that far, there are sound reasons for this. Un-stretched monofilament is not strictly a fibre. The material, some variant of nylon, is homogeneous i.e. having the same composition throughout; of uniform make-up, specifically, the line's physical properties are the same in every dimension. So it the line will stretch 10% of its length, longitudinal stretch, it will also stretch 10% of its diameter, if you could pull on it from either sides of the line's outer-diameter or transversely. The longitudinal stretch absorbs shock very well - this protects the hook hold and ensures that strain on the knots is not applied suddenly. The transverse stretch improves knot strength and reliability. In most knots there is some constriction of the line at some point. If you constrict un-stretched line, it squashes without losing its strength per se, as long as the constriction is within the elastic limit of the line.

If this doesn't make sense, consider a piece of pole-elastic with a paper clip over a section. The paperclip will compress or squash the elastic a little. If you pull either end of the elastic, its breaking strain will not be affected, as long as the paperclip is compressing the elastic past its elastic limit.

Lastly: everything I have ever read suggests 200 yards ydsIf you want metric, convert it yourself.  as being a goodly amount of line on a reel. That might be appropriate if you are casting 100 yards and expecting a 100 yard run from the fish, but for my fishing, that's 'optimistic at best'. If you margin fish, or do not cast more than 50 yards, I would suggest 100 yards is probably good enough. Most waters are not that wide. If you use a decent backing line and knot it carefully, peace of mind is easily obtained and I achieve this as described in the next paragraph.

My main reel is the 'Cardinal 66x' for which I have many spare spools - I take one such and put the length of mono on it that I'm ever going to use for actual fishing, say 100 yards. I then tie the mono, using the 'JAA Magic Braid Knot' to a cheap round braid in the 30-40lb range - matching the diameter of the monofilament to the braid are nearly as possible. I then fill the spool using this braid. I then wind the whole lot back onto the actual spool I'm going to use. You need to take a little care at the knot - it's worth winding this on by hand - place the knot right against the 'top' of the spool (the side away from the body of the reel) and then putting enough turns over it to cover the ends. Then continue winding.

This will ensure you have enough monofilament, and the braid, carefully covered over, will last you for years and the spool is now the right depth for 100 yards of the 'right' mono. If Leviathan is snagged, the knot, with its longish ends will run reasonable well through the rings, with any 'bumps' be nicely absorbed by 100 yards of un-stretched monofilament...although this has yet to happen to me.

Lastly, if you want to start fishing without kinks in the line, you can use an electric screw-driver to load the spool - although the line lay is your very own problem then. I've kept a spare spindle for this purpose, and one should keep the screwdriver speed quite low. If you're wondering how to exactly measure 100 yards of monofilament...buy it in 100 yard spools, at least for the initial set-up.

Perch'perca fluviatilis'...(and back to the top of the page) PerchStripey Perch'Sarge' PerchA 'swagger' of perch Perch'Sarge' PerchA 'swagger' of perch PerchA 'swagger' of perch Perch'perca fluviatilis' PerchStripey Perch'Sarge'

Fettling Fishing Tackle  Some Thoughts on Braided Fishing Lines.

I have occasionally used round unfused braids, but I find they are not very compatible with fixed-spool reels, as they get into a horrible mess from even a few kinks. However, the lack of stretch and good knot strength make then handy for some fishing, such as piking with a multiplier reel and even a centre-pin, for the rare occasions I go pike fishing.

I do use fused floating braids for trotting though. Berkeley Fireline for example, in white, is thin, floats and has virtually no stretch. I find it convenient to use an 8lb mainline for trotting and tie three feet of mono on the end, either directly or via a small swivel. This way, your float doesn't tend to get lost if snagged and switching from a very fine hook-link to (say) 6lb is very easy. Plus striking even at long ranges (40yards+) requires no more of an effort than at 10 yards.

There is a school of thought that braided lines can damage fish. I think that's possible, but that has to be set against the damage done by repeated captures at short regular intervals. I'm of the opinion that if you're concerned about fish damage, fish lightly-stocked waters. Those who bang on about how it's all down to braided-lines and nothing that all to do with 100lb match-weights of dumb stock-pond carp don't have a leg to stand on, some might say. But that's just me.

Many clubs/fisheries insist on braided line for piking. The argument is that one can use a heavy breaking strain braid (say 40lb) and in this way, traces or lures that are snagged can be retrieved by wrapping the line around a piece of broom-handle (on in my case, a six-inch nail) and pulling the line until the hooks open. The second argument is that the use of such heavy line ensures the fish is played to the bank as quickly as possible, so not exhausting the fish.

These arguments make sense at first glance. However, the nagging doubt that the braid might damage fish has caused the appearance of a thick yard-long leader of monofilament (e.g. 40lb) between the braid and the wire. A psychologist might consider this merely 'uncertainty reduction'. This seems nonsensical to me, as the first 18" of the tackle is WIRE. Still. Some might think that a better way to protect your pike is to use one large single hook and put the fish right back after a quick snap on the mat, instead of holding the fish off the ground for trophy photographs. Still, what do I know? pikeI'm not advocating breaking any rules. If you fish a water you've agreed to keep the rules, and if I really want to fish a venue, I'll fish using dumb rules, as long as they are not harmful. If I can't stand the rules, I'll not fish there at all.

should be old ledger weights...coffin...(and back to the top of the page) should be old ledger weights...barrel... should be old ledger weights...coffin... should be old ledger weights...barrel... should be old ledger weights...coffin... should be old ledger weights...barrel...

Fettling Fishing Tackle  Some Thoughts on Braided Hook-Lengths.

Since 1985, when the feral carp in Pike Pit presented themselves, I've used braid hook-lengths. This is due to Richard Walker's comments on braid, which make good sense. Basically, for a given breaking strain, braid is very much limper/softer than monofilament and for a fish taking a bait the feel of line is very often the most important thing. The stiffness of monofilament increases in relation to the square of its diameter. Twice as thick means four times as stiff, so fish can feel it. The look of the thing is secondary, as long as it blends in fairly well. Fish are used to 'strandy' things on lake beds, plant life being 'strandy' by nature. This will feel soft and limp. monofilament has a hard feel, like a hair in your mouth and will be ejected well before similar b/s stranded braid. The little stub of monofilament line that 'half-blood' or 'clinch' knots leave by a hook can't help.

You can prove it to yourself (quite right too, don't just take my word for it) with three pieces of 3lb line and one strand of 9lb of the same make and manufacturer. If you plait the thinner lines, you'll see the resulting cord is limper by far than the single 10lb. I used 3 × 7lb plaited Perlon for pike traces, so can vouch for this. If you want to plait monofilaments, or braid them for that matter, I recommend using lace-making bobbins ('google' that if you want to know).

In 1985, I used 11lb Milward Black Spider braid, which was as thick as my 8lb 'Perlon' main line. I would dip 4-5" of the braid hook-lengths in polyurethane varnish and when quite dry, attached them to the monofilament with a four-turn water-knot. As long as the lines are about the same diameter and the varnish is absolutely 100% dry, this is solid at the b/s of the weaker line. I tested this to be sure (R.Walker's method again). A knot for tying the hooks to the braid was harder to pin down. In the end, an hour one evening with a set of scales proved that nothing seemed to work as well as standard 'half-blood' and my 1978 print of RW's 'Still Water Angling' didn't have the 'grinner' knot . I had read that compressed blood-knots in braid could fail on the second use under strain, so I retied the hook after every fish. So far, so hoopy.

When I first fished Milton Abbey for tench in 2004 I got the 'Black Spider' out again, with many tench, bream and roach to show. Things move on, so I bought a bunch of hook-length and 'feeder' braids. Hook-length braids are good, but the price is daylight robbery, which is why I'm not naming any and don't buy it. Most of my hook-length braid comes from Hong-Kong. I buy 'no-name' uncoated dyneema and for the money I don't mind the odd duff spool, it's easy enough to test when it arrives. It's generally thinner than the equivalent 'branded' braid, but thicker than a branded 'super-specialist' braid. So pfft.

A well known 'feeder braid' in 6lb & 8lb makes good hook-lengths for general fishing, being thin, limp and a dull green/grey, plus a sensible price for 100m. Modern braids flatten easily, so knot well, and also tend to be thinner than monofilament of the same (or approximately the same) breaking strain.

First things first, how to tie on the hook? I used the 'Uni' or the 'Uni Snell'. I experimented with nylon-to-braid knots and decided it was simpler to use a rig-ring and 'uni-knots' in both monofilament and braid. In about 2010 I came across the 'Albright' knot for monofilament-to-braid. I use this exclusively now, as it's the most reliable and strongest knot I know of at the time of writing in 2018.

For general fishing, 'fishing for bites' stuff, I'll often use a 6lb braid hook-length with 14/16 hooks 'Uni-Snelled' on. If I'm expecting larger fish, I'll go for 8lb mono/braid. This may seem like heavy tackle, but find it works and the catch rate is very good. It may be with finer tackle I'll get more bites (or not), but I'm happy with that. On those occasion I fish still-waters that have no carp, I'll even fish 4lb mono/feeder-braid. Crucians don't seem to mind.

It works for me.

For river fishing, trotting, I'm not sure braid would have many advantages. Possibly for static baits, but if the bait is off the bed and moving, then it's monofilament for me.

The Lady of the StreamThe Lady of the Stream...(and back to the top of the page) Thymallus ThymallusThymallus Thymallus The Lady of the StreamThe Lady of the Stream Thymallus Thymallusgrayling The Lady of the StreamThe Lady of the Stream Thymallus ThymallusThymallus Thymallus The Lady of the Streamgrayling Thymallus ThymallusThymallus Thymallus

Fettling Fishing Tackle  Kinking.

Lines kink. That's life. With a fixed spool reel, if you use the clutch to play fish, then you will tend to get kinked line and sometimes even if you don't. There are two several solutions. The first one is to find a fast flowing river and let out a long length of the line, say 20-40 yards, into the current and let it hang freely under the surface for a period of 10-15 minutes. The line will graudually unravel.

The second involves a special fluted weight, which when retreived rotates the other way to the line twist that a regular fixed spool has imparted. It might be chepaer to buy some cheap mackerel spinner and bend the fins 'the other way'.

The third way is to put a rod up and thread the line through the rings and tpae th end onto the cardboard tube from a loo-roll. Wind as much line as is kinked onto the tube and tape the line down with gaffer tape. Let it dangle free until the line is untwisted. Then unspool another rod length, tape the line down and do it again. Seems long winded, but it only takes few minutes and works a treat.

So learn to live with removal of kinks in your line. And do remove them. Kinking causes tangles on the rod tip, worse ones at the reel, both of which sneak past your attention, and for a given pull on the line, increase the strain on the line and the knots. Worth doing.

Perch'perca fluviatilis'...(and back to the top of the page) PerchStripey Perch'Sarge' PerchA 'swagger' of perch Perch'Sarge' PerchA 'swagger' of perch PerchA 'swagger' of perch Perch'perca fluviatilis' PerchStripey Perch'Sarge'

Fettling Fishing Tackle  The JAA Magic Braid Knot.

A few points...I don't claim to have invented this entirely ALBI've since found out that it's also been written down by Shaun Harrison as the "Combi-Link Knot" using single strand of braid, rather than doubled over, and I'm reliably informed [by GOS] that it's as infallible with single braid. Naturally we both think our own version is best and neither of us can be bothered to check if the other is better. Obviously mine is (kidding GOS, just kidding...). . This is a modified Albright. I've tested and used this knot with Stren Original & Maxima monofilaments and Silkworm/Merlin/Softsilk braids as well as 'no-name' dyneema braids.

The braid and monofilament need, ideally, to be in the 'same ballpark' for thickness and b/s, e.g.

"4lb 'Silkworm'/4lb mono.,
6lb 'Silkworm'/6lb mono.,
8lb 'Merlin'/8lb & 10lb mono.,
10lb 'Silkworm'/10lb mono.

The knot integrity seems to be driven by the braid being about the same thickness as or a little thicker than the monofilament...but DO YOUR OWN TESTS would be my advice. Head to head against a double-grinner this tested as stronger and more reliable. I don't think this knot would work so well with extra thin pre-stretched hook-link materials but I've not tested that.

You need to make a loop in both the braid and the monofilament. Then place the loop in the braid through the loop in the monofilament...

JAA knot #1 'one' JAA knot #2 'two'

...and make six turns of the doubled braid around the mono-loop working away from the loops. Keep these turns reasonably spread out.

{you do this in reality, by making the loops in the lines and holding the loops in place with the little finger of each hand. This leaves the thumb and forefinger on each hand free to make the turns up}

JAA knot #3 'three' JAA knot #4 'four'

When you have reached six, make six further turns working down towards the loops, over the top of the first six. When you have reached the point where the two loops intersect, put the braid loop through the mono loop in the same orientation of the first.

Then moisten and tighten by pulling on the loop and both tag ends of the braid and the loop until the knot snugs right down. Most of the time it'll be neat and tidy, but occasionally a loose loop will show, I try to remove this by gently working the ends/loop of the braid, but in tests an untidy knot performed no worse that a neat one.

Trim the ends...taking care to trim the right ends. If, you, like me, prefer to protect a knot, if you slip a few latex float stops over the mono before tying the knot, then you can slide them down to the knot and trim the end very sort above the last of the stops.

Here are two real ones, tied in 8lb and 10lb lines....

JAA knot #1 Here are two real ones, tied in 8lb and 10lb lines....

The big ball bearingy thing is a 'Type 80' radar-head bearing, it's good and heavy. This demo used strimmer cord and a bit of nylon string, not the type of end tackle I typically use...despite rumours circulated by other less well-rounded anglers.

Safety Pin HookSafety Pin Hook (and return to the top of the page) Safety Pin HookSafety Pin Hook Safety Pin HookSafety Pin Hook Safety Pin HookSafety Pin Hook Safety Pin HookSafety Pin Hook Safety Pin HookSafety Pin Hook Safety Pin HookSafety Pin Hook Safety Pin HookSafety Pin Hook Safety Pin HookSafety Pin Hook Safety Pin HookSafety Pin Hook Safety Pin HookSafety Pin Hook Safety Pin HookSafety Pin Hook Safety Pin HookSafety Pin Hook Safety Pin HookSafety Pin Hook

Fettling Fishing Tackle  The Grinner or 'Uni' Knot.

I mostly use the 'uni' or 'grinner' knot for tying line to a hook or a swivel. Like all knots, tie it carefully and tighten slowly with the line lubricated with water or even oil if you like. The lubrication helps with removal of any heat from the knot as it's being tightened. With nylon mono, one turn around the eye works well. In my tests, two turns of line through the hook-eye are a tiny bit stronger than one, BUT, if those two turns of mono overlay each other in any way, the knot will snap suddenly at well below the line's advertised strength. It's harder than one might think to tie the knot and tighten it with those turns snugly alongside each other. So hard in fact, I've given up and tie a solid 'one-turn' every time rather than risk a 'snapper'.

I use six turns through the loop for 6lb mono and 5-6 for 8lb and 5 for anything above that.

It's trickier to tie than the half-blood, but is marginally stronger so I converted to it, especially as in the finished knot the tag-end is pointing up the line, which is better, especially with small hooks and baits.

the 'Uni' or 'grinner' knot the 'Uni' or 'grinner' knot, this is a left-handed view, 'cos JAA is left-handed

You might see a version with the tag-end twisted around the standing line before making the loop - this looks different, but in fact these turns pull out when the knot is tightened, so make no difference to the finished knot. with uncoated braids I run two turns of the braid through the hook eye, but it matters how this is done. If the 'turns' are crossed there's a tendency for one turn to 'travel' around the hook-eye to the cut end of the hook's wire. You'll need to work out for yourself which side of the hook to feed the braid through to avoid this!

the 'grinner' knot the 'grinner' knot, original version

P.S. So here is the grinner with the line wound about the standing part. As discusssed the turns on the standing line pull out when the knot is tightened so there no point to them - but...if you want to put two turns of line through the hook eye, there is a problem if those two loops' turns cross as noted above. Jim Gibbinson noted that some lines produced a lower breaking strain with a clinch knot with two-turns through the eye in a "Let us Talk" article, although not the reason and I worked it out for myself a few years ago.

Now, if you tie the 'grinner' as above, the 'redundant' turns untwist and have the effect of 'pushing' the two loops through the eye into a proper alignment, in the same way that you have to put a slight twist into rope when you are coiling it to prevent kinking. When this insight struck, I was sceptical, but I've tried it a few dozen times and it seems to work. But, unless I take a jeweller's loupe with me to the waterside, I'm not able to check the knot is 'right', so practically, I stick with one loop through the hook-eye.

Bye-the-bye, I tested the 'two-turns-through-the-eye' 'Grinner' against a 'two-turns-through-the-eye' tucked half-blood knot and there was no significant difference in breaking strain.

should be an old quill floatProper Float...(and back to the top of the page) should be an old quill floatAnother proper float

Fettling Fishing Tackle  The 'Uni' Snell.

I tried the 'knotless' knot (which is topographically an 'Allbright' on a wire loop). I never tested the strength in nylon mono, but it can untie itself when used in orthodox fishing and I'm going to state that 'if you need to glue a knot you need a better knot' so I use the 'uni-snell' these days.

the 'Uni-snell' knot the 'Uni-snell' knot, this is a left-handed view, 'cos JAA is left-handed the 'Uni-snell' knot the 'Uni-snell' knot with the line shown passing through the eye from the 'inside'

I always tie this knot with the line passed through the eye from the 'inside' of the hook so it finishes as shown in the second picture. I believe this improves the hook-up chances as it causes the hook to 'turn-over' as it's pulled. I'd also suggest that it's worth tying the knot 'left' or 'right' handed depending on which side of the hook-eye the 'gap' is. This helps to ensure the main line is not pulled hard onto the cut end of the wire when under strain.

The Lady of the StreamThe Lady of the Stream...(and back to the top of the page) Thymallus ThymallusThymallus Thymallus The Lady of the StreamThe Lady of the Stream Thymallus Thymallusgrayling The Lady of the StreamThe Lady of the Stream Thymallus ThymallusThymallus Thymallus The Lady of the Streamgrayling Thymallus ThymallusThymallus Thymallus

Fettling Fishing Tackle  The Slider Knot.

See this below. I have two uses for this - I used it to attach floats [before anyone invented float stops], by using two knots and one piece of line and for stop knots when slider float fishing. I find it works best tied with braid around mono. For thick braid, four turns is fine, for thin braid, seven or eight turns.

JAA slider knot #1 Just a slider knot In reality, the length of braid loop was as short as I could practically make it. It didn't occur to me at the time to incorporate a tiny link-swivel.
HookHook, eyed, fishing for the use of...(and back to the top of the page) HookHook, eyed, fishing for the use of. HookHook, eyed, fishing for the use of. HookHook, eyed, fishing for the use of. HookHook, eyed, fishing for the use of. HookHook, eyed, fishing for the use of. HookHook, eyed, fishing for the use of. HookHook, eyed, fishing for the use of. HookHook, eyed, fishing for the use of. HookHook, eyed, fishing for the use of. HookHook, eyed, fishing for the use of. HookHook, eyed, fishing for the use of. HookHook, eyed, fishing for the use of. HookHook, eyed, fishing for the use of. HookHook, eyed, fishing for the use of. HookHook, eyed, fishing for the use of. HookHook, eyed, fishing for the use of. HookHook, eyed, fishing for the use of. HookHook, eyed, fishing for the use of. HookHook, eyed, fishing for the use of. HookHook, eyed, fishing for the use of. HookHook, eyed, fishing for the use of. HookHook, eyed, fishing for the use of. HookHook, eyed, fishing for the use of. HookHook, eyed, fishing for the use of. HookHook, eyed, fishing for the use of. HookHook, eyed, fishing for the use of.

Fettling Fishing Tackle  Some Relative Knot Strength Tests.

By which I mean testing one knot against another to see which is the strongest. This is really all you need to know, that is, which knot does the best job with the line in question. Once you've found the strongest knot, you can if it amuses you, do an absolute strength test to see what kind of percentage of the line's breaking strain you're getting. Even that needs comparison with the line's measured breaking strain, rather than the quoted one. Still.

There's no sensible order to the below. They're mostly done on whim as and when I feel the urge to find out. I've got a few things to do first, but I want to test the 'grinner' or 'uni' against 'clinch' knot and also against one or two of the others. I've also got it in mind to test the various 'loop' knots for joining traces as I've seen the 'figure-of-eight' and 'double-overhand' both touted as the strongest, among others.

It'll cost me a few hooks but I also want to test the 'Domhoff', tied in both the variants I've seen, agaisnt the 'uni' snell as well and the 'winner' against the best eyed-hook knot.

Loop-Knots

This has alway niggled at me. On the face of it neither looks to be better than the other, but the figure-of-eight looks neater. Who cares about that?

I tied the loop knot with the line through a swivel and used spring scales to tighten the knot by stressing to 50% of the stated b/s four times and then 75% of the stated b/s four times and then broke the line with a straight smooth pull without the scales.

Test
#1
Test
#2
Test
#3
Test
#4
Test
#5
Test
#6
Test
#7
Test
#8
Test
#9
Test
#10
Line
Double
Overhand (1)
vs Figure-of-Eight (2) (2) (2) (1) (1) (1) (1) (2) (1) (2) (1) 8lb
Stren
Original
(1) 6:4
Double
Overhand (1)
vs Figure-of-Eight (2) (2) L (1) (2) (1) (1) (1) L (1) (1) (1) 6:2

After ten tests the result was 6:4 in favour of the double-overhand. On that sample size that's hardly conclusive, so I ran more. After 18 tests (two broke the line but neither of the knots), the overall score was 12-6 to the double overhand. Almost conclusive.

What this suggests is that the double overhand has a higher average b/s, but both knots have spread of b/s's which overlap. To get a sense of which has the smallest Standard Deviation (SD) of breaking strain and hence the more consistent knot, you'd have to perform a series of absolute tests on each knot and calculate the average and SD. I might I might not. For the moment I'll stick with the 'double-overhand'.

Perfection Loop verses 'the winner'

Test
#1
Test
#2
Test
#3
Test
#4
Test
#5
Test
#6
Test
#7
Test
#8
Test
#9
Test
#10
Line (2)
Perfection
Loop (1)
vs 'winner' (2) 8lb
Stren
Original

Hook-knots

The business end. Arguably the only knot you ever need...

We'll start with a 5-turn grinner vs a 6-turn, one loop through the hook eye. 8lb Stren original. The links' wire was 0.58mm/22 thou in diameter, the line diamters 0.28mm, 11 thou.

Test
#1
Test
#2
Test
#3
Test
#4
Test
#5
Test
#6
Test
#7
Test
#8
Test
#9
Test
#10
Line (2)
Grinner 5/1 (1) vs Grinner 6/1 (2) (1) (2) (1) (2) (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) 8lb Stren original (1) 8:2

--

Test
#1
Test
#2
Test
#3
Test
#4
Test
#5
Test
#6
Test
#7
Test
#8
Test
#9
Test
#10
(1) (2)
Grinner (1) vs Clinch (2)

--

Test
#1
Test
#2
Test
#3
Test
#4
Test
#5
Test
#6
Test
#7
Test
#8
Test
#9
Test
#10
(1) (2)
Grinner (1) vs Sharman (2)

Grinners in spectra

A 5-turn grinner one-turn through the eye (5/1) vs a two-turn, two-turns (5/2) through the hook eye. 6lb 'spectra' braid, nominally 0.1mm diameter. The links' wire was 0.58mm/22 thou in diameter.

I used spring scales to tighten the knot by stressing to 50% of the stated b/s four times and then 75% of the stated b/s four times and then broke the line with a straight smooth pull without the scales. I made no effort to tie or see if the 5/2 knots had the turns aligned or overlapped.

Test
#1
Test
#2
Test
#3
Test
#4
Test
#5
Test
#6
Test
#7
Test
#8
Test
#9
Test
#10
Line ()
Grinner 5/1 (1) vs Grinner 5/2 (2) (1) (1) (2) (2) (2) (1) (1) (2) (1) (1) 6lb 'spectra' (1) 6:4

--

Just a place holder really, but 'on the list' are:
'Albright vs double grinner',
'the best loop knot' vs 'the best hook knot',
'The Domhoff #1' vs 'uni-snell'
'The Domhoff #2' vs 'uni-snell'
'best whipping knot' vs 'the knotless'

I'm sure I'll change this and think of others as I go along.

should be an old quill floatProper Float...(and back to the top of the page) should be an old quill floatAnother proper float

Fettling Fishing Tackle  Albright vs. Grinner Relative Knot Strength Tests.

The below were started as 'absolute' tests but in practise are 'relative' tests. One of the advantages of cheap spectra braid is that you feel happy about blowing a few meters away testing knots. The daylight robbery that is 'carp braid' makes that a pricey business (by-the-by I strongly resent this piece of price inflation) I think it unlikely that the machines that can turn out 300m of spectra for less than a fiver are somehow not up to making 30m of 'carp braid' for the same pro-rata price and the whole thing reeks of a cartel. Never mind the sneak down to 10m spools from 30m...without pro rata price reduction.

The below results shows very clearly that the 'combi'/JAA braid knot is one of the most reliable knots. In fact the most worrying knot below is a two-turn grinner in spectra braid, snapping 2-3lb under the 'combi'.

Doubled spectra 6lb/0.1mm braid and 6lb Stren Original.

The braid loop was through a swivel - if you refer to the the 'combi'/JAA braid knot up the page you'll see the knot is tied with a loop of braid. Here, I put the braid through the swivel eye then tied the knot in the usual way, leaving the swivel captive in the loop at the end. I wanted to test this as I've occasionally thought it might be good to tie a hook on in this way to give it complete freedom of movement. The monofilament was tied into a double-overhand loop. P>This assembly was pulled four times to 2lb, four times to 4lb, then at ¼lb increments until a break.

Test No. # Test #1 Test #2 Test #3 Test #4 Test #5 Test #6 Test #7 Test #8 Test #9 Test#10 Average Std. Dev.
Broke at 5lb 8lb 6½lb 7½lb 7¼lb 8lb 7½lb 7lb - - 7.1lb 0.92
Broke at the... Mono loop knot Mono Mono Loop knot Mono Mono Mono Mono Loop knot Mono Loop knot - - - -

The break was either in the mono. or the overhand loop knot in the mono. This suggests the overhand loop is pretty good, but it clearly suggests the 'Albright' is stronger than the overhand loop.

Doubled green spectra 8lb/0.12mm braid and 8lb Stren Original.

As for the previous test, the braid was tied to the mono. with the 'combi'/JAA braid knot doubled-loop tied, 6 turns up and 6 down with a swivel in the braid loop. The mono. was tied to swivel with a 6-turn grinner with one turn of the mono. through the swivel's eye. This assembly was pulled four times to 4lb, four times to 6lb, then at ¼lb increments until a break.

Test No. # Test #1 Test #2 Test #3 Test #4 Test #5 Test #6 Test #7 Test #8 Test #9 Test#10 Average Std. Dev.
Broke at 9lb 10½lb 10¼lb 10lb 10lb 9¼lb 7½lb 9½lb 8lb 9.25lb 0.95
Broke at the... Grinner Grinner Mono Mono Mono Grinner Grinner Mono Grinner Grinner - -

As for the previous test, the break was either in the mono. or the 'grinner' in the mono. Again, this suggests the 'grinner' is pretty good, but it clearly suggests the 'Albright' is stronger than the grinner.

Doubled grey spectra 10lb/0.14mm braid and 10lb Stren Original.

As for the previous test, the braid was tied to the mono. with the 'combi'/JAA braid knot doubled-loop tied, 6 turns up and 6 down with a swivel in braid loop. Mono. was tied to swivel with 6-turn grinner with one turn of the mono. through the swivel's eye. This assembly was pulled four times to 6lb, four times to 8lb, then at ¼lb increments until a break.

Test No. # Test #1 Test #2 Test #3 Test #4 Test #5 Test #6 Test #7 Test #8 Test #9 Test#10 Average Std. Dev.
Broke at... 10½lb 13lb 13¼lb 11lb 12lb 13lb 12½lb 10lb 12¾ 10½lb 11.85lb 1.16
Broke at the... Mono grinner Mono Mono grinner Mono Mono Mono Mono Mono grinner Mono Mono grinner - -

As for the previous tests, the break was either in the mono. or the 'grinner' in the mono. Again, this suggests the 'grinner' is pretty good, but it clearly suggests the 'Albright' is stronger than the grinner.

Doubled grey spectra 10lb/0.14mm braid and 10lb Stren Original.

As for the previous test, the braid was tied to the mono. with the 'combi'/JAA braid knot doubled-loop tied, 6 turns up and 6 down. A swivel was tied to the tag end of the 'combi/JAA braid knot' with a 6-turn grinner looped twice through the hook eye. The mono. was tied to swivel with 6-turn grinner with one turn of the mono. through the swivel's eye. This assembly was pulled four times to 6lb, four times to 8lb, then at ¼lb increments until a break.

Test No. # Test #1 Test #2 Test #3 Test #4 Test #5 Test #6 Test #7 Test #8 Test #9 Test#10 Average Std. Dev.
Broke at 11¼lb 10½lb 10½lb 10½lb 10¾lb 10½lb 10¼lb - - - 10.6lb 0.29
Broke at the... Braid grinner Braid grinner Braid grinner Braid grinner Braid grinner Braid grinner Braid grinner - - - - -

It can be seen that the grinner knot tied in the braid broke first every time, so the feeblest knot in the assembly. Again the 'combi/JAA braid knot' showed itself to be stronger that the 'grinner' at least in this braid.

All tench are good tenchAll tench are good tench...(and back to the top of the page) There are no bad tenchThere are no bad tench All tench are good tenchAll tench are good tench There are no bad tenchThere are no bad tench All tench are good tenchTinca tinca little star...
05:46am on 2018-09-26 JAA