The Lucky Dip Page

This page produces 25 Lucky Dip randomly selected diary entries (between May 2005 and October 2020) every time it is loaded. These are in random order, i.e. not in chronological order, so of course some of them are out of context...they are also filtered to remove the 'non-fishing' entries. Just because.

Each entry has an icon/bullet of a randomly selected pair of dice, because, 'you know', and this icon also hyperlinks to the original diary page entry. This last facilitates the location of the previously mentioned missing context...

In the spirit of the 'Lucky Dip' here is a randomrqNot 'random' in the true sense of the word, but a random pick from a selection of quotes that I quite like. There will be Pratchett. And Nietzsche. quote:

"En fleira er mönnum til hugganar en fébætur einar." ("There are more things to be thought of by men than money alone.") ~~ The Saga of Grettir the Strong, Chapter 47 ~~ 

should be old ledger weights...coffin...(and back to the top of the page) should be old ledger weights...barrel... should be old ledger weights...coffin... should be old ledger weights...barrel... should be old ledger weights...coffin... should be old ledger weights...barrel...

Lucky Dip from 2019  16th June 2019. Opening Daze. The glorious started at 4:30am with the patter of rain on the lean-to roof and the rhythmic thudding of larger drops from the eaves, the latter signifying 'more than a passing shower'. I went back to sleep...and at 6:30 the sounds were the same and at 7:30, but headed for a sausage sandwich and some coffee anyway. I could watch the cricket highlights if it was still raining...I pootle off around 9:30, grey, damp skies and a fine drizzle. I'm going anyway...the late hour (late? Hah!) re-setting the flask from coffee to tea.

I popped 'Rumours' on the DTDriving Technology's built in jukebox and 'Gold Dust Woman' was fading out as I crossed the dam. Spot on. GP was there already, since 4am, impressive given that it was cloudy, rainy, the wind was fishtailing about the pond in gusts and it was quite cool for the time of year. Sadly for both of us he'd not caught, although I winkled out a few roach in the next swim using the bait of charlatans and mountebanks (a.k.a. maggots). Even those roach, nice fish of a hand's size, pulled tentatively on the thinnest sliver of cane and after the first couple, I switched the hook down to 16(ish) fine wire with a single maggot, as it seemed like a scratching day.

Nevertheless, as if enlivened by the talismanic arrival of Pete, a solid crucian of over 1lb took the bait. I presciently noted I wouldn't be surprised if it was the only one. GP offered around his very very fine chocolate-chip-and-banana cake. Pete went on. Jim turned up and wisely went further up the bank. Another gentle dip of the float led to a good tench and I briefly engaging in a violent squabble, in which the hook, called upon to arbitrate, found in favour of the tench. The fish left, stage right, in a furious cloud of bubbles lined into the lilies. Damn.

The Saxon PondsPitch the First The Saxon PondsThe Lone Crucian The Saxon PondsThe float rod and '450
The Saxon PondsThe second float The Saxon PondsThe third float The Saxon PondsThe Last Pitch

GP caught a fine roach and after another hour I 'called it' and decamped for my tea and a trip around the pond. Jim had a small crucian and was getting bites, so hypothesising the shallow water was perhaps warmer I set up camp. For me, this didn't work...in the end with evening on the horizon, I cleared a middle swim of reed mace and flag iris using a vicious curved knife on a landing net handle (sorry Jim!) and fished the last two hours out in as fine as swim as one might wish for.

Not that the float even twitched for those two hours...I followed on GP's heels, wishing Jim more luck than we'd had to date. "In Through the Out Door" for the road home, fish pie, new potatoes and a ridiculous chocolate cake waiting chez Anotherangler. Pretty good for the ritual day.

Lucky Dip from 2007  3rd February 2007. Tidal Piddle & Pitmans Pond. The Louisiana swamplands of Dorset...

Fired up by an 'APFA DVD' I resolve to do some river fishing and because the Holme Bridge Frome stretch is often well patronised, I head for the tidal Piddle. The first thing to note is that you need to make your way to the river through a mixture of low alders and lookalike Louisiana swamp plus a gruesome looking (and smelling) dyke, to which a fertile imagination could add the heaped bodies of the Viking invaders in 843AD. On reaching the river I find it's not technically unfishable. It's just very, very hard. I find a couple of acessible swims and spend 15 fishless minutes in each with grayling bobber'd maggots. In most other places the water has covered the banks so well I cannot get close to fishable water. After wandering up the dyke towards the town, I get to the bit where the levee turns at right angles; the marsh on the other side of it makes progress, well, awkward, OK impassable then (where the levee breaks left there's nowhere left to go). I head back for the car.

OK then, the 'oil works' stretch of the Frome. The gate is locked which is a pest as well - I leave a message with the secretary about that, but I've not heard anything since...

• ...onto Pitmans then.

Not a stress busting trip so far, but to make the best of things I head for Pitman's pond. In hindsight I should have gone (piking?) to Holme Bridge or home. But the sun is out and despite the gaggle of youths at the pond (noisy but otherwise social and enjoying their fishing), it's pleasant in the sun and I opt to drown my maggots with my float rod - I'm not optimistic, it's been almost freezing at night for a week and the cold water augers a blank.

The gaggle is converging on one of their band who is 'in'. I silently and unkindly root for the fish. A carp has topped to my right, but I opt to stick with the float rod and 4lb line, which will suffice for rudd and stuff. An hour passes and I have not so much as a twitch on the maggots and there is still some small carp movement. I switch to the Avon, cockles and worms - I remember some crushed hemp and make some hemp-and-corn balls to ground bait and lean back and watch my laissez-faire float from under the hat brim. The crowd have fallen silent and my world is reduced to the orange tip in the corner of my vision. There is a hint of spring, a false promise and it's 10°C in the sun, which is chilly, but by real winter standards, balmy.

A buzzard cry, distant with altitude, pierces the calm like a water drop on a millpond. High up hunting for supper, the first is joined by its mate and it occurs to me they can see my float better than I. Two crows go into attack mode at the lower buzzard, the cawing shattering the quiet, crazed glass, against the drop-in-a-millpond cry of the buzzards. The victim veers away radiating indifference and languidly retreats 50 feet higher up.

My quill is over indolent, even for me, so I move it an inch down the line and turn the windsock into a candle flame. Better. One of the gaggle has gone around to the other side of the lake to free his last hair-rig from a carelessly placed bush. Well, that's one interpretation anyway. At least he been up to his waist in mud and water for his trouble - it appears there is a fine line between dry land and flooded marsh. I switch to a semi-cocking quill (one of the copper foil bottomed pheasant quills made a few weeks ago) no reason, back to sunning myself and waiting.

An hour later I have one 'twitch' to show. I've added some more crushed hemp and water to corn to make lumps of ground bait. Worth a try but I suspect the antics of the gaggle have put the carp down even here where little seems to bother them. Still, a great day to be out in the sun - the sky is clear and the glare is in the corner of my right eye. As long as the sun is on the water I feel there is a good chance of a careless carp. But for now, the orange tip is lifeless without even the feel of a fish. Now there is a magpie chattering at the gaggle, or more likely warning other wildlife to keep away.

Classic. I was watching the black band on the float move with respect to the waterline and after a few minutes of this I had a darting bite. No result. Still it's a start. Something is moving; at least it feels like it. I'm sure there's a fish down there, going by the float the small fish I wanted when I turned up have finally arrived, lured by the ground hemp. Now, I'll wait for a take until dusk, but then decide to shrink the hook and I spend ten minutes catching a dozen rudd to 'unblank'. I switch the hook back and wait for the last half an hour of daylight for a carp. Not this time. Oh well, many worse ways to spend a day in the sun - last to leave as usual, the lights go out on their own.

Lucky Dip from 2012  24th October 2012. Bishop's Green. To which I had pre-destined myself, on the back of two long, hard and relatively fish-free days, on the basis that it had gonks and roach, a good plan, a day for the soul of the angler. Olympic-fortified, found the lake grey lit and misty, doldrum'd-leaves sailing the surface and most of the brush cut back. One other unpacked as I did and told me Strokins', of the day before yesterday, was up for sale. He took the corner nearest the car-park and I ambled around the far side of the lake and picked a pitch roughly where the deep run along that bank starts to shallow a little. Also pre-destined is the 'light carp' (GHSRE), 6lb line and a size '14', more like a '12'. Short 6lb braid link, knotted directly on and a long thin cane stemmed quill. I fouled a screamer plumbing the depth, which pulled off. Uh-huh. I put on a cockle and two minutes later nabbed a carp which fought like a demon, then 20 minutes later a 'ghost', and 20 minutes after that the first of a score of gudgeon that counter-pointed the rest of the day. A size '18' and a scrap of worm will get one-a-chuck here, so it is never dull.

Smith's Lake, Bishop's GreenBishop's Green carp frenzy Smith's Lake, Bishop's GreenBishop's Green carp frenzy Smith's Lake, Bishop's GreenBishop's Green carp frenzy Smith's Lake, Bishop's GreenBishop's Green carp frenzy Smith's Lake, Bishop's GreenBishop's Green carp frenzy

I get more gudgeon, another carp, then another, then another, all hurtling of across the lake on light tackle. The pattern set for the morning, but in between the carp, the gudgeon, the one roach, thought I would caught more. I am missing too many bites and a couple pulled off, easy to think they were fouled. I get to 1pm, lose a couple in the next hour and decide to think about this. What would Moley do?

Smith's Lake, Bishop's GreenBishop's Green carp frenzy Smith's Lake, Bishop's GreenBishop's Green carp frenzy Smith's Lake, Bishop's GreenBishop's Green carp frenzy Smith's Lake, Bishop's GreenBishop's Green carp frenzy Smith's Lake, Bishop's GreenBishop's Green carp frenzy

I did not have any cake, so walked back to the car for fresh hemp, the dregs of the old all gone, enquired of the corner fellow, he had lost one. I recalled a similar Moley mudpig problem and in the end opted for 4" over-depth, a 'tell tale' no.4 and 2×no.8 equidistant from each other to keep the trace on the floor. I up to a size '12', hook a small worm, once, as near to the head as possible, grayling style.

Smith's Lake, Bishop's GreenBishop's Green carp frenzy Smith's Lake, Bishop's GreenBishop's Green carp frenzy Smith's Lake, Bishop's GreenBishop's Green carp frenzy Smith's Lake, Bishop's GreenBishop's Green carp frenzy Smith's Lake, Bishop's GreenBishop's Green carp frenzy

This worked, kept working, the antenna wavered when a fish was tail-up and darted on a blow-in-and-out and stayed under when taken. Responses were extreme with even 4-5lb fish streaking off like whippets. I snapped a crow that popped down for a wash-and-brush-up at the edge of the zoom range, the weather did not budge, the leaves built up until the ever nosy fish started nudging them, I wondered about the surface but opted to carry on, feeling like the club batsman who has, without noticing, coasted into the nineties against a weak attack and then wonders whether the next ten runs are worth anything...but then carries on, as you do not do that every day. 100The first time this happened, I decided that I should go from 86 to 100 in three shots or bust as I was fairly sure I was run out on 86, but it was 'our' umpire...I was out for 86, but I think they should have counted the first run as I completed it with the ball still in the air...the second time I played properly then hit across one on 106...
During that 86 I back-foot square-drove a six. Short boundary, but still.

Smith's Lake, Bishop's GreenBishop's Green carp frenzy Smith's Lake, Bishop's GreenBishop's Green carp frenzy Smith's Lake, Bishop's GreenBishop's Green carp frenzy Smith's Lake, Bishop's GreenBishop's Green carp frenzy Smith's Lake, Bishop's GreenBishop's Green carp frenzy

The corner-man packs, I suspect he has blanked and finally the sun turns up, just in time to leave again, I put polaroid's on and spot the clouds of silt radiating from under my feet...more gonks, I lose a big carp to a hook pull after five minutes of slugging. I miss a bite which sends a big bow wave across the mirror-top, then get my last three fish, all of which fought fast and tenacious, one making 25 yards across the width of the lake and then 30 yards down the bank.

Smith's Lake, Bishop's GreenBishop's Green carp frenzy Smith's Lake, Bishop's GreenBishop's Green carp frenz Smith's Lake, Bishop's GreenBishop's Green carp frenzy Smith's Lake, Bishop's GreenBishop's Green carp frenzy Smith's Lake, Bishop's GreenBishop's Green carp frenzy

The last two are here, not so remarkable, 9lb and a shade over 10lbs, solid and lean. I punt off, enough, now for the Frome and its grayling. Project Gutenberg's "The Sign of Four" keeps me amused on the drive home. "By Jove Holmes!"

Lucky Dip from 2010  22nd August 2010. Arfleet. It would be easy to conclude from the above, that I'm strolling onto the lake of my choice and extracting fish at will. When I arrived today there were five anglers on the front lake and three on the back. Against all common sense I opted to fish the back pit, despite the bright orange umbrellas of the trio. I sat in the rain for 120 damp minutes and failed to interest a fish on the top or the bottom and got soaked. I gave up, went to the front lake, now down to two anglers, tried for a fish on a lily pads which wasn't there, tried in the monk corner for a fish that was there but did not care and when I attempted to cast to the island, normally tricky to get the distance, the bait went halfway up the tree and I broke my line and went home. Should have gone to Wytch.

Lucky Dip from 2007  28th May 2007. Revels. Tricky but pleasant. I like this water, which is tucked around the back of the complex, too far to walk and not very easy when you get there. It has shallows, a deep end and enough carp to see, but today, not enough to catch. They were there, but whatever I did wasn't the right thing. That happens, nice spot though.

Revels, the 'Pike Lake'Lilies and stuff Revels, the 'Pike Lake'Lilies and stuff Revels, the 'Pike Lake'Lilies and stuff Revels, the 'Pike Lake'Lilies and stuff

Lucky Dip from 2013  29th August 2013. Silent Woman Lake. At dawn this morning I saw Autumn sneaking under the hedges, the meadow across the road had a thin layer of ground mist pooled in the old river bed, washing over the sheep like soft rolling breakers on a glassy sea ahead of a strong wind.

I had to do that thing to get a job, blech, then was drawn to a water where I could sit at the shallow (12-18") windward end and have a reasonable chance of a carp. In the end I did very well indeed, a happy convergence of the right mood and the fish crowded into a smallish area, I weighed the largest bottom caught fish at 9½lb and this was comfortably exceeded by the last and best of the surface caught - bob-fishing the bottom for the first half of the afternoon, missed half-a-dozen, lost a lunker, then switching to 6lb on a '66x for the top - the reel in the picture is the clue.

Arfeet MillsSilent Woman Lake, Just at the right end... Arfeet MillsSilent Woman Lake, Just at the right end... Arfeet MillsSilent Woman Lake, Just at the right end...

Next time I shall fish the drop-off for the bigger ones. Oh yes. The downsides here, a permanent smell like the inside of old dustbins from the landfill on the windward, the continual noise of earth movers and screeching clouds of gulls that follow their every move. It's enough to put you off. Really.

Arfeet MillsSilent Woman Lake, Just at the right end... Arfeet MillsSilent Woman Lake, Just at the right end... Arfeet MillsSilent Woman Lake, Just at the right end...

Lucky Dip from 2010  17th June 2010. Arfleet. I go for a quiet dibble on the front pit, ESP floater, half a stolen loaf and get a 5lb ghostie on the first cast, a long-flung 40 yard arc'd crust that dropped right in the one foot gap between reeds and bank, then line-curlingly bad casting for two-and-a-half hours, a missed take on a lily patch, a spooked fish under my feet and finally an 11/12lb common tricked out of the island reeds after two misses. Both landed with the unhooking mat, the landing net itself being on the garage wall, the Lord alone knows where the scales are and the flask of tea sat quietly on the kitchen worktop, leaving me with a throbbing head. So much fun...and two more carp... [C: 2/1] [Ctotal: /]

Arfleeet MillsThe long throw ghostie Arfleeet MillsThe tricked common

Lucky Dip from 2006  11th June 2006. Milton Abbey Lake. 'Bugangler', golden rudd and a flotilla of pike...off to Milton Abbey with the 'Bugangler' for a dangle. Peg 7 was picked as it has shade, and with the temperature in the 22-24°C region, shade and hats were the order of the day. I went again for the Avon and simple maggot rig, and as before when neophyte fishing, put a 'chuck and chance' rig of luncheon meat out to the right. Well you never know.

Milton AbbeyThe Bugfloat

The depth here, as intimated previously, is around 3' in the narrow depression nearer the bank. Setting up a 2 × No 4 crystal and a 6lb rig (tench...) I plumbed the depth and following the pattern of the previous weeks caught a couple of roach doing that. I then handed the rod to the learner, with a couple of rod rests to take the weight. Contrary to expectation the sun remained resolutely behind a cloud for the session, which was a good thing. With some loose fed maggots we had a steady stream of bites, which over the next three hours, four sandwiches, a cereal bar and a banana produced a dozen roach at least, 2 × 8oz perch and two small handsome golden rudd, a rare treat.

Ratty put in an appearance as well, and good to see him. The mink haven't made it here yet, thankfully. Around 12:45 my 'chancer' bite alarm bleeps loud, but if a true run, the hook missed its mark. The bites are tailing off a bit, and what with the 'Bugangler' not doing 'sitting still' we have little wander around to see if we can't catch one of the stick-like small pike that are lurking in the shallows with the roach and rudd around the far side of the spit. In this we fail (although several are spotted and fade quietly into the murky water when spotted, although do add another roach to the bag. Another missed opportunity but for the worms I hadn't dug and taken. But a good bag - piccies of 'Bugangler's Bag' below. We pootle home at 2:00pm to return the fished out 'Bugangler'.

Milton Abbeythe 'Bugangler's Bag' Milton AbbeyRatty out for a paddle Milton Abbeythe 'Bugangler's Bag' (plus two tench I caught later on)

Two rounds of sandwiches later I return for a go at Pitch 13, as I saw several VERY large roach there from the earlier wander around. I bait hemp and corn mixed with crushed hemp and maggot with some crushed hemp for luck. Although there are plenty of fish visible, nothing happens, except I get the sun in the mush and on my arms, as the clouds had cleared while I was home, this left me sitting in the blazing afternoon sun. I stick it out against the time it dips below the tree line, but even so with only one missed bite between then and 6:15 I considered returning to the swim of the morning's triumph...but another bite and a half pound roach keeps me going.

As the sun dips, it cools, but the real swim killer is the pike. This female in the picture, with it's back out of the water was circling the pool, with three hopeful male fish in close attendance for a couple of hours - which might have a bearing on the lack of fish. Some pictures of the odd procession...worth a closer look at this, zoom right in. Not something you see every day.

Milton AbbeyAmorous pike Milton AbbeyAmorous pike Milton AbbeyAmorous pike Milton AbbeyAmorous pike
Milton AbbeyAmorous pike - worth a closer look at this one Milton AbbeyAmorous pike

Anyhoo, I stuck out the increasingly fishy feeling and with another roach to keep me interested, spotted the tench slipping into my swim and had a fast bite at 7:05pm from a tail I could just see in the murk, which turned out to be a tench at 3½lb (ish) and other at 7:20, at 4lb on the scales. I have one more roach in the next hour and a last tench, 3½lb more or less, at 8:00pm with a roach at 8:10 and headed home. Odd, but another tench fisher around in peg 1, also had a very quiet session, so the morning with the 'Bug' was the pick of the day. You'll not want to see another tench. Oh go on then.

Milton AbbeyThe best of the tench, at 4lb. Never bad.'

Lucky Dip from 2009  18th January 2009. Crooked Willows. I last came here in about 1993 or thereaboutsIt was pretty much just a hole in a field at that time and to be honest hadn't realised it was the same place until I got there, I was just looking for a change of venue. I park myself at the far end of the lake (you know, 'furthest from the car park') and set up a small float and Avon-fished maggots for anything that came along.

Crooked Willowsblack and white kind of day Crooked Willowsblack and white but unwavering
Crooked Willowsnot really a January fish Crooked Willows...possibly a bit breamy Crooked Willowstechnically small fry Crooked Willowsoften a January fish

After an hour of motionless float watching I get a simple bite and a reasonable carp which wallows rather than runs. The swim starts to liven a bit after that and while nothing approaches the first fish, a good stream of roach, skimmers, bream and a small carp come to the net, despite the cold weather.

Crooked Willowsslab-let Crooked Willows..too black and white for the camera Crooked Willowssnotty!

Nothing exceptional, but a good regular day's fishing, which often is what it's all about.

Lucky Dip from 2012  9th December 2012. Luckfield. Potty maybe. But the lake is all mine, and not fished for a fortnight if the book is believed. I try peg 3, more of a recce. something swirls on my left while I tackle up the Adcock, GHSREGreat Hexagraph Salmon Rod Experiment and whatever line is on the reel. An hour of observation under the grey sky, without bites pushes me to stroll with thermometer. 4.3°C at base, 3.9°C at peg 5 and then 4.3°C the rest. Peg 10 sees another lackadaisical swirl, as the first right under the bank. Funny thing, the water is bobbling in the corner and small roach are jostling under leaves, staining the water with clay, almost spawning. The thermometer tells me it's not water temperature. Funny. I decamp to Peg 1, it's a good spot at the marginally warmer end and today a bite will be a win (as I'm not supposed to fish where the roach are playing). Maggots fail for an hour, I try flake.

Luckfield LakeAnother great Luckfield blank Luckfield LakeAnother great Luckfield blank Luckfield LakeThe Very Small Sharp Knife, its means of maintenance and two foundling floats.

I suck two squares of 90% chocolate and sip coffee and the mingled flavours run me a quick peep show of winter sessions past. Maybe Wytch next time, a great spot for winterfish. A fish has actually rolled in the corner. Wonders never etc. etc. I take bread to see if the rockers in the corner are feeding, but not it seems. I debate the B&WThe Bruce & Walker MKIV 'G' s/u free-lined illegally in the corner, watch the float some more, try to snap a goldcrest, talk about a moving target. Back on flake a slow slow bite. Well then. 2:30pm, not over yet. Coffee, 90%.

Luckfield LakeAnother great Luckfield blank Luckfield LakeAnother great Luckfield blank Luckfield LakeAnother great Luckfield blank

The last two hours or so trickle by, the last hour punctuated with dragging bites from fish uniformly too small for a '14' draped in maggots or bread. I'm not sufficiently bothered about cracking a blank to slip a smaller hook on...I snap a tree creeper, not perfect but fun trying. The last drag under, hard not to imagine some small and determined fish with the line over one shoulder plodding across the bed, drags me off as well. Winter's days. Still good.

Lucky Dip from 2013  17th August 2013. The Stour, Shillingston. One of those short trips between Dad's Taxi drop and pick-up, made shorter by rain - the right bank is thickly overgrown, a border of some past crop of oilseed rape blocking sight and access at most points along the river, not a bad thing on the whole, but one must watch where one treads, steep banks and 8 feet of water even in summer flows. I find a spot nearly opposite the old station (I silently curse Dr. Beeching and his report) and spend an enjoyable time plucking small roach on bread from 7' of water. The Woodsman arrives on his bike, comedy almost and proves my point on the hidden banks by cycling past me twice, a diminuendo of creaks and rattling rods...

We opt for a swim at the bottom of the field, a good one for chubs and perches and I carry on with the small roach while TW tries worms out as minnow bait, although I suspect that wasn't the plan. The grey heavens creak open, promised, but still, then the fares 'text' saying the fete has packed due to rain so I have to leave, pity. TW'The Woodsman' (keep up) went on to Luckfield for a greyer evening (but plenty of tree cover) and managed a 14lb'er, so that's OK then.

Lucky Dip from 2011  26th July 2011. The 'Lower Lake'The Victorian Estate Lakes' - see 'Crock of Gold', the 'Upper Pond'The Saxon Ponds' - see 'Crock of Gold'. A guest trip to a place with properly good crucians which hid, although I gulled several golden rudd and then, stalking the river arm, ran into C- coming the other way, also stalking, traditionally we'd have bumped floppy hats before seeing each other, but sadly for the small gods of silent comedies, we both were sufficiently wraith-like for this to be avoided. Although the sight of two bearded floppy-hatters approaching each other unawares on opposite side of the same spit, rods in one hand, nets in the other, has considerable comic potential. Neither of us caught one. My host had to run so I dropped into 'The Saxon Ponds'The Saxon Ponds' - see 'Crock of Gold'...

The Victorian Estate Lakesthe Victorian Estate Lake (lower) The Victorian Estate Lakesthe Victorian Estate Lake (lower) The Victorian Estate Lakesthe Victorian Estate Lake (lower) The Victorian Estate Lakesthe Victorian Estate Lake (lower) The Victorian Estate Lakesthe Victorian Estate Lake (lower) The Victorian Estate Lakesone of the blank avoiding golden rudd The Victorian Estate Lakesstalking the carp that wasn't there

...and managed to extract a couple of small crus. and a tench but it was tricky fishing, tiny bites far between. C- turned up again looking for his water bottle, apparently tossed into the bush behind me...giving in, with a chuckle he labelled my twitching rod hand a 'conditioned reflex' and headed for the lower, cadging cockles en passant. A try with bread on the drop gets a wild bite and a three pound tench launches porpoise like into the pads and leaving the hook on a pad stem. I give in, can take a hint then get mugged by a Jack Russell while watching C-'s float for a while, one of my cockles extracting a roach, before heading home up the down.

The Saxon Pondsthe Saxon Ponds (upper) The Saxon Pondsthe Saxon Ponds (upper) The Saxon Pondsthe Saxon Ponds (upper) The Saxon Pondsa small but perfectly formed one The Saxon Pondsa smaller but still perfectly formed one

Lucky Dip from 2011  4th April 2011. Silent Woman. I'd anticipated a warm and grey day with a strong SW wind making the lake ideal for fishing crust at long range...at the last minute I put the Avon and bait bucket in the car a good call as it turned out. I went to the lee end but there were no fish moving and the wind was fishtailing around the island making it hard to fish how I'd planned. I put a small bamboo insert quill on and baited a small area only 10 feet from the bank, the idea being the fish's approach to this area would have reeds between us. I loaded a '14' with a worm-and-grain-of-corn and kicked back...when I got a few bobs put it down to rudd but when, after missing several dips I hit a fish which slowly got heavy on me and then produced, after a ping, a single 10p sized scale, I thought better of it and paid more attention. Thirty odd minutes later I hit the slide and after a lively battle landed this. A start. Somehow the 4lb hook-length was snapped by the swivel so I re-tied it and tried again.

Silent Womanthe pitch Silent Womanthe float in the pitch Silent Womanthe best looking mirror

In the interim I'd seen a fish leap ahead of me and there was a fish cruising the surface, on and off, in the bay to my left so after a bit I put a heavier float rig on and snuck into the corner and spent an hour fishing a cockle and worms in two weedy spots, baiting quietly and continuously with chopped worms and half cockles. Nada. Without even a swirl for indication, I went for a stroll the other way in case I was missing something and then settled back on the Avon. I lost the '14' in a rush stem, when the braid broke so I switched to 6lb and a size '10'. Three more came out in the next two warm sunny hours, despite pulling the hook out of the largest, all the while firing bread into the bay, where it was occasionally taken.

So at 6-ish I snuck back with a hook and the loaf and tried to get a take on crust from the back of the bay but after 40 minutes of having my bait ignored, even when it had drifted into the reeds, I snuck another 15 yards to some ripples behind a screen of old rushes, flicked a crust out, hooked the line over a dead rush and tweaked the bait until it was at the bottom of said rush. I expected to have to wait for 15 minutes, but 15 seconds was all I needed, ignoring the suck and waiting for the bow in the rush-to-rod line to lift 6" and that-was-more-or-less-that.

Silent WomanAnother cunch of barp Silent WomanThe view across the 'bay' Silent Womanthe best looking common, might have been the largest, can't really recally

I went back to the Avon and with the light starting to grey-up nabbed another one on the float. My first thought on reaching the car was that it was nice to just fish in a regular way and catch. My second thought, a mile down the road was that it would have been so much nicer to have had a mixed bag rather than carpcarpcarp. My third thought on the matter, over supper, was that this is what so wrong with contemporary fishing. You've a job not to catch a carp - and they are easy to catch and so, worth very little, so even on a nice day, you get the feeling you're missing something...

Lucky Dip from 2010  10th July 2010. Luckfield Lake. A quick four hours on the loaf, resulting in a 6lb or so mirror, an 8lb common from Peg 11 and another 6lb mirror from Peg 4. Or something like that. [C: 3/0] [Ctotal: /]

Luckfield Lake6lb or so mirror Luckfield Lakean 8lb common from Peg 11 Luckfield Lakeanother 6lb mirror from Peg 4 Luckfield Lake...and then it was dark

The real story of this evening was the way I missed three takes under the tree on peg 11, then had the company of a lad who leaned over the fence and watched me manage, eventually, a common on a lump of bread. I'm not getting the floaters right yet, but I gave him a small waggler liberated from a tree to start his collection. A gent who set up a bivvie on Peg 3, who admitted that long-lining was lazy fishing, then cast one line 30 yards alongside the big lily patch and lost two fish which of course kited hard right into the thicket at said 30 yards range. It's hard to see how any other result was possible. Some might call that irresponsible. He also used flouro mainline and said he often had to go through five yards of line on a session to get a good hook knot. Odd strategy...he did confirm the presence of some rod thumping coal-barge fish that run off your line at a steady pace, which is interesting - to eel anglers. I suspect that my last gasp in Peg 4, although yielding a mirror right off the cuff, was in the end frittered away by 'Mr. Two lost fish in the lilies' and an angling presence in the way of the patrol route. I missed one under the tree on the right, self inflicted.

Lucky Dip from 2014  4th April 2014. Silent Woman Lake. Two hours, two carp, both on the LRH No2 which, even allowing for smallish fish, performed well. The water's gone 13.3°C to 13.9°C on a warm wind, spring sun and the shallows. Carp#1 was inspecting the reeds on the left, but not silently enough, so I popped on bread, fed a few bits and waited. The float cheerfully popped up and then down to give me a clue. The second, bottom fished, might have telegraphed with the slightest swirl, a wait and the float edged into the wind and the tip slipped under. A big bunch of cockles strikes again.

There was a peacock butterfly on the mat, it scooted when I went for the camera and a lone lost duckling. Five geese, no ducks. One of the geese is pushy and it's driven the others to the far corner and is lording over itself at the other end. Quite wild, all give me a wide berth. I swap the float for a slender 'porcy' and miss a slidy bite after five minutes of knowing something was up without quite being able to put my finger on it...

Silent Woman LakeSilent Woman Lake and it's dustbin smell and sea-gull cries Silent Woman LakeSilent Woman Lake and it's dustbin smell and sea-gull cries Silent Woman LakeSilent Woman Lake and it's dustbin smell and sea-gull cries Silent Woman LakeSilent Woman Lake and it's dustbin smell and sea-gull cries Silent Woman LakeSilent Woman Lake and it's dustbin smell and sea-gull cries

I eat a second pie to 'boost my spirits', but mostly to eat the pie, swap cockles for mussels. The wind freshens a tad, I'll wait. Which I did. Despite the water at 14.1°C I was just thinking I called it wrong when the orange shrank to a quarter inch and held. I paused and when it moved, wanged the LRH round sideways and got a lively mirror that went 30 feet on the first go. I like this rod.

I carried on and got another twenty minutes later, the floating slipping away like a ghost in the day. Heh. There's more slurping round the corner and I slip down the bank and soak my knees trying for what turned out to be a group of fish...I missed two tentative pulls, watching the float still attached, the second strike leaving the tackle in a topologically impossible snarl which I stupidly tried to unravel while loose feeding. Gave up, bit the tangle off, grinner'd a hook off the hat and laid an Arlesey bomb shaped piece of bread a foot out, had to wait fifteen minutes and four careful inspections and even then I waited until the 8lb rustled over last year's rushes. The largest of the day streaked out to the middle, ploughing the shallow water in a long arc then spent a long time resisting the net at the last.

Silent Woman LakeSilent Woman Lake and it's dustbin smell and sea-gull cries Silent Woman LakeSilent Woman Lake and it's dustbin smell and sea-gull cries Silent Woman LakeSilent Woman Lake and it's dustbin smell and sea-gull cries Silent Woman LakeSilent Woman Lake and it's dustbin smell and sea-gull cries Silent Woman LakeSilent Woman Lake and it's dustbin smell and sea-gull cries

I tried again and a longer cast got interest, something lunged and missed at a cautious return, so I nicked a whole prawn on and pulled line of the 'pin into a pile and flicked it twenty yards off, scudding it back one cast, sink and draw the next...then it was too dark...

Lucky Dip from 2005  8th July 2005. Milton Abbey Lake, Dorset. Drowsy.

Onto peg 5, which is nicely tucked away from the main body of the water which had several anglers on it, ('crowded' today). The water here is a little under four feet, where I was fishing and the water had plenty of colour, which compared with some other swims on the lake was a bonus. Just under the line of the pictures I regularly saw carp swim past, in no hurry. A good reason to keep still.

The plan here was to stay on until dusk to use the new blue Beta lights. Just as well really, as the first three hours yielded a only couple of knocks. Very frustrating, as there were fish moving all day and feeding as well, around the float, beside it, surprised they weren't on top of it. I varied the hook length, the hook size, the bait, the size of bait. Nada. It's good for the soul to be reminded occasionally that you are not as good a fisherman as you think...I told myself, as another tench bubbled past the float. I've skipped the usual description, for pictures. Well it's easier and nicer to look at.

Milton Abbey...still water... Milton Abbey...go on, go on, go on, go on, go on, go on, go on... Milton AbbeyMilton Abbey bream #1

Nevertheless I persisted. Well it wasn't dark yet. About 9:30 I had a bite which I missed in astonishment and then in the next half an hour had a bream (1½lb), a tench (2½lb) and a roach (½lb) in quick succession. Good oh. Then someone dropped by for a chat and killed the swim stone dead. I changed to a beta light and after an hour (including that annoying 20-30 minutes when it's too light for the beta light and too dark for a regular float), I had another bream and another tench. Got used to the betalight after a while. It seems to be easier to see if you don't look right at it. But that might be my eyes. At 11:30 or so, with it quite dark I called it a night.

Milton AbbeyMilton Abbey tench #1 Milton AbbeyMilton Abbey tench #2 Milton AbbeyIt was dark and that's what the float looked like. It's a tiny white dot in the bottom left quadrant. It is. Really.

The saga of the braid comes to an end. After tying and testing (with scales) about six traces, during the afternoon and getting one good one the Drennan braid goes in the bin. The black thread/outer sheath seems to go quite often. It's as if the braid has a mix of fibres, some of which stretch a different amount to others. More research needed, but PowerPro looks good. Any feedback gratefully received...

Lucky Dip from 2010  14th February 2010. Milton Abbey. Receding weed (I hope) and some roach to 1lb, and two tench which came off the hook. Well, I wasn't quite expecting them.

Milton AbbeyThe Pump Pool and it's weed. Milton AbbeyThe dogwood Milton AbbeyThe second best roach Milton AbbeyThe best roach

Lucky Dip from 2014  14th March 2014. River Sem. Tiddlers, proper ones, big gonk, huge minnows, a 1lb chub, a 10oz roach...real fishing.

The River NadderThe River Nadder
Spring sunlit Nadder...1
The River NadderThe River Nadder
Spring sunlit Nadder...2
The River NadderThe River Nadder
Spring sunlit Nadder...3
The River NadderThe River Nadder
Spring sunlit Nadder...4
The River NadderThe River Nadder
Spring sunlit Nadder...5
The River NadderThe River Nadder
Spring sunlit Nadder...6
The River NadderThe River Nadder
Spring sunlit Nadder...1
The River NadderThe River Nadder
Spring sunlit Nadder...2
The River NadderThe River Nadder
Spring sunlit Nadder...3
The River NadderThe River Nadder
Spring sunlit Nadder...4
The River NadderThe River Nadder
Very very fat minnow...5
The River NadderThe River Nadder
A clonkin' gonk...6

The little Avon Gypsy looks the part, but truthfully one needs a quicker retrieve even on a little stream, as a hooked fish can go one of two ways, which for convenience, we will call 'up-stream' and 'down-stream'.

Lucky Dip from 2013  27th May 2013. The Wetlands. I fished a very small pond and in the end scratched a tiny quill with a size 18 around the inflow eddies for a couple of hours for three 'nudges', a bumped-off crucian of about 4oz and this little tinker...

The WetlandsThe Wetlands '6' The WetlandsThe Wetlands - trotting, kind of. The WetlandsThe Wetlands '6'
The WetlandsThe Wetlands '6' The WetlandsA tiny Wetlands tinca

...on turning up and seeing as the water was clear as glass, that's two fish more than I thought I'd contact . Good fun.

Lucky Dip from 2012  8th July 2012. Wytch. Popped out pm, just pleased to be out after the rain. The lake has overflowed its bank on the west side, the water running down the meadow to the Corfe river. I waded halfway across this overflow and used a strong wind to drop lumps of bread under the far bank, with the water only three inches from the top of the wellies. I had two decent mirrors around 7-8lb, both of which I had to beach like a salmon as the net was left out of reach (along with my bag with the camera in it, so had to use the Small Technology's) then lost one to a hook pull.

Wytch Farmcarp #1, Blackberry snapped, beached like a salmon in the long grass and running water Wytch Farmcarp #2, Blackberry snapped, beached like a salmon in the long grass and running water

I then spent two hours trying to catch on the deck in the NE corner swim, wangling a single a 10oz roach/rudd hybrid (I would guess) to show.

Wytch FarmThe north-east corner swim Wytch FarmThe old Hardy float in the chop Wytch FarmLooking south down the lake Wytch FarmThe roach/rudd hybrid

I then moved up the bank to a patch of lilies and nabbed three more carp to about 9lb, one mirror, one ghost and one common, all on bread and hauled out of the lilies, with the 'Big Hex' they had little much chance. I doubt any of these three were more than six feet from me when they took the bait.

Wytch FarmThe most favourite swim Peg. 3 Wytch FarmCarp #3 Wytch FarmCarp #4 Wytch FarmCarp #5

I have no idea why I did not take any pictures of the overflow, it is not often you see the lake running over its banks, across the meadow and down to the Corfe river.

Lucky Dip from 2011  3rd August 2011. Darnell Pools, Shropshire.

One of the nicer places this, picked at random from a roadside sign seen on another day. I find three pools and a jolly lady doing something unspeakable to some reluctant sheep, probably for their own good. We trade tropical disease stories and I fail to win the "bugs top trumps" with a jellyfish sting...I also find out that it's £5-a-rod-a-day and there is a match on the lower pool - there are three pools and I opt, after farewells, to walk about a bit. There are a over a dozen cars and six other anglers on the main lake and I chat with two chaps trying to catch carp off the top in one corner, but their 'persil' blue-and-white shirts may be affecting their chances...but being a tactful chap I suggest cinnamon bagels as a change bait.

I move on and chatting with a family on the top pool, the wonderfully named "Hackenchop Pool", I opt for the top end of the middle pool, clearly the windward and shallow end, seems obvious although as warm "anywhere and bait" would probably catch. However, I tromp off for bait and rod and sit amid tussocks and soft rushes. There's no bare earth here which is nice.

Darnell Pools, Shropshirethe old 'nearly floating flake taken on the drop' gag, strikes again... Darnell Pools, Shropshirethe lake from the North, windward and shallow end Darnell Pools, Shropshirea self cocking porcy out for a bob Darnell Pools, ShropshireJAA's complicated set up...

I float fish for a bit, catch a bream and several rudd. I pay a lady the money and a rising carp changes my tactics and I nab this guy on flake in the end, cast to just float or just sink, pick one. I go back on the float after an attempt to catch a clooper in the end corner, but it won't play. Then it's seven o'clock and I have the place to myself. Amazing. I get a 12lb mirror, long lean and dark which fought like a dervish (four-piece Avon and 8lb line) and then three smaller one and a tench...but that's out of about 15 bites, fish spooking at the line, the bait and so on. The water is 18" deep and in the end I realise the right way here is either to fish lift with the bait under a vertical (and possible visible) line or fish at least a foot over-depth and wait for a real bite.

Darnell Pools, Shropshirethe hard yards 12lb mirror Darnell Pools, Shropshirecommon mudpig Darnell Pools, Shropshirecommon with two passengers Darnell Pools, Shropshirea welcome and very decent tench with two more passengers

Either way, with dusk approaching, I switch to one hook and the bread...I nab one to my right barely two feet from my feet (I admit to feeding along the edge with dry mixers for the last two hours) and then get another bigger fish from the other side of the clump on my left which takes a crust hanging vertically from my rod end, yanking the spare foot of line out of my fingers.

Darnell Pools, ShropshireSurprise! Another common... Darnell Pools, Shropshirethe lake at dusk, the smudges are bats Darnell Pools, ShropshireGood Lord, another common carp... Darnell Pools, ShropshireA very decent common, 9-10lb maybe?

With the light almost gone, I underhand a big bit over a clump three feet further left where a nettle and bramble have collapsed flat on the water. I can barely see the white smudge of bait and after the age, OK, 15 minutes, a nosing fish launches at the bread and I strike at the sudden whirlpool, blind-hopeful.

The fish streaks off to my right, nice heavy tail-beats, across the lake and I recall Walker's advice to keep the rod high in the dark to gauge the fish's direction and then, right there I get my own moment in time, with the rod arc'd against the orange-and-indigo sky and the fish finally brought to a wallowing halt some two cricket-pitches distant, only surface scintillations giving the position away. For an instant, fleeting, the world spins around this locus, past, present, future and the setting sun all converge on this point...then I remind myself that I've 8lb line and a long battle starts, with repeated runs shortening yards yards a time and several hard bores left, which I counter by walking along the bank and a long time later (it seems) the fish is wallowing over the net and I have to guess a bit in the gloom to net my 18lb common.

18lb common carp 18lb common, a priceless moment in time

I'd go back. Darnell Pools.

Lucky Dip from 2016  29th December 2016. Barcombe Cross. Cold, bright, fabulous. A day that flattered the photgrapher.

Barcombe CrossBright, cold Barcombe CrossBright, cold
Barcombe CrossBright, cold Barcombe CrossBright, cold Barcombe CrossBright, cold
Barcombe CrossBright, cold Barcombe CrossBright, cold
Barcombe CrossBright, cold Barcombe CrossBright, cold Barcombe CrossBright, cold Barcombe CrossBright, cold
Barcombe CrossBright, cold Barcombe CrossBright, cold Barcombe CrossBright, cold Barcombe CrossBright, cold

Despite it being a day when one scratched for fish, the Thane of Sussex managed to enliven and trap a carp off-the top, fantastic effort. Such a glorious day, it was, for me, a 'fish optional' day.

Lucky Dip from 2007  31st August 2007. River Stour at Fiddleford. A decent perch and gudgeon, praise be...I've brought the recently restored Webley & Scott Super Avon rod - it required another 'test-fish', as the previous trip to Breech Pond yielded little to test it with...

I headed for Fiddleford as it's close to the office and although it was cloudy today, even dark enough to suggest rain once or twice, nothing came of it. It's spot of great beauty even when fish-less, hopefully not the case today. Bob had slipped down to join me for a bit in a non-fishing capacity and the company is always pleasant.

I started fishing on the weir pool itself, as I could and while it's not always the best place I persisted with maggots and a bobber well past the point where three-inch daces and the occasional roach satisfied. I'd gone with 4lb line through and a size 14, but I bent that on a rock and switched to a 16 on a water knotted trace of 3lb maxima, which helped hit the bites. An interesting turn of events followed when returning one such dace. A large bristly perch materialised out of the water under the sill and harried the dace into a gap in the stones, where it wisely stayed. The perch, despite wedging itself into the gap in the rocks, eventually slunk off back to it's ambush spot and I put on three good red maggots and a worm tail and first drop got a plunged bite and a lively tussle with the perch seeking the strong flow several times before eventually and grudgingly being netted. A bit over 1lb and a fine start - sadly none of it's school mates were available to follow. Naturally this occurred five minutes after Bob went on.

Fiddleford Mill, The StourFiddelford perch Fiddleford Mill, The StourFiddleford Mill Fiddleford Mill, The StourFiddleford Mill chub

The main flow was a little over strong to fish directly and the side flow was back towards me in a series of whirls and I discovered that the fast bites right after casting were small dace as mentioned and the easier to hit bites after the bait settled were small roach of a few ounces. I tired of this in the end and head off downstream, where the river leaves the weir pool. On the gravel run where the water leaves was a shoal of roach, which was interesting and for a few minutes I trotted the narrow channel downstream of this, yielding a couple more fingerling dace.

I tried a few trots and skipped off a small dace and then gave in and put on a light stick, with the bottom stem shortened. I then caught several dace, then a small chub, ½lb perhaps. I then latched into some gudgeon and relaxed into this most fun of things catching at least a dozen, before the fun palled.

Several hours had now passed, so I wondered around the pool to where an angler with three cane rods was perched and exchanged information about his cane rods, besides which my 30 year old glass Avon seemed a little ordinary. We did the ritual comparison of quill floats. Honour satisfied, he latched into a big chub while I was there, 5¼lb at the net. Well worth the detour, a fabulous fish.

I wondered off upstream for a bit, with a couple more small dace, then returned to the pool, fishing the side of the weir stream for the pool edge, which necessitated a change of float to give casting range. I'm not sure how long I fished here, but got into a rhythm casting and following the fractal path of the float along the edge of the stream towards the weir and then back down the main stream. I tried maggots which yielded several roach to 4oz and many small dace. I swapped to corn and for 45 minutes had not a twitch. I discovered my arm was tiring, it's a fine rod, but heavy to hold for several hours. I pulled inshore for a long neglected cup of tea and discovered gudgeon here as well, smaller and after a refreshing cup or two, went though another dozen gudgeon or so before calling it a day.

Fiddleford Mill, The StourFiddelford and gobbies Fiddleford Mill, The StourFiddleford mill gudgeon Fiddleford Mill, The StourFiddleford mill gonks

I enjoyed that - but I think I might have enjoyed it more if I'd had a loaf of bread...

Lucky Dip from 2006  18th November 2006. Milton Abbey. Madness enhanced by carelessness. One might have thought by now that I would know better than to try for a carp in near-freezing temperatures, but had got the bug in the head, so Saturday afternoon took off with some mussels, hemp and few worms then went down for a go. As I ought to have guessed, the water was fining down, clear, even on Peg 12 where the best chances might be - fish were moving but not feeding, although the summer weed was still here. I baited up. Flat calm water, the sky was clear and even with the nip in the air I would much rather be outdoors.

A few tench are lurking and there's plenty of roach about. On 10lb line I strung a piece of peacock quill, a long tail from the 'tell-tale' BB, then set up about around 6" over-depth, terminated with a size '6' Jack Hilton, a lob-worm and large mussel. I would have bet on my only real chance being in the last hour, but as it turns out that was not so, but in the end the lack of fish was self-inflicted (so often the case).

The afternoon wore on pleasantly enough, even too pleasantly. The sun hid early on, which took it out of my eyes, but still no wind while a better fisher than I streaked back and forth, fishing opposite and to the right. After an hour came a bleeping from the main lake. Oh good. A large lead hit the water 100 yards off, which made more noise than the 40 yards distant kingfisher hitting the water from fifteen feet up. The late autumn colours are excelling themselves, the red of the bushes on the far bank nicely setting off the overstaying leaves and patches of green weed. It's like an oil painting today.

Milton AbbeyTold you it looked like an oil painting

A movement near my feet and the float twitched and a big swirl of mud announced a spooked fish. I don't recall moving but maybe I did. I'm joined by small flock of long tailed tits in the tree to my right and notice an orange blob near the kingfishers spot on the far bank. I muse on the lost tackle and resolve to collect it later. I wonder why I'm not interested in changing tackle and trying for the tench or the roach and then a 4lb jack-pike materialises from the depths, a spectral torpedo, gently breaks the surface 6 feet from me after some imaginary prey and receded back into the mirror with hardly a ripple. Five minutes later a big twitch on the quill and a huge cloud of needle bubbles gets my interest but it turns out to be an ejected bait and another a spooked fish. Late in a long season maybe? I remove the float and switch to free lining with (wait for it) silver foil and coil or two of line on the unhooking mat. Well I know it's a cliché but a surprising effective one and my intent is to remove the vertical line that might be brushing the fish off.

More dithering from the king of fishers but not nearly enough for a picture and at 4pm with the cold gathering itself for the twilight, I wander round to pick up what turn out to a large plastic pike float and I find a small cruise missile on the way, but according to the writing on the side it's a carp float of some sort. If I had a crossbow I could bring down small game with it. Warmed by the walk, I return gently to the penultimate coffee and re-cast, flick the line off the rod and the foil jerks, which make me jerk and after waiting five minutes, check the bait to find the tail gone from the worm. I replace it and settle back. Owls have started up now, a feature of this hollow place I quite like and then another huge explosion of bubbles and a twitch of the rod-tip signals another spooked fish.

Milton AbbeyFive minutes later a big twitch on the quill and a huge cloud of needle bubbles... Milton AbbeyI resolve to enjoy the twilight and the last cup...

Hmm. I resolve to enjoy the twilight and the last cup, despite the toes numbing a bit. I watch the light fading over the trees opposite, turning the view black-and-white and listen to the owls calling back and forth. Then a twitch of the foil, another cloud of bubbles but despite sitting until 5:15 there is nothing I might call a bite. I pack up and it occurs, dullard, it might have been better had I sat back from the edge of the water, keeping the rod from poking out over the clear water. Sometimes it's as if you're not trying hard enough for a fish.

Lucky Dip from 2017  6th August 2017. the Wetland. This stock relocation exercise was far too much fun...the plan was to move small tench, now showing at pre 'Operation P' levels, from pond '3' to pond '2'. The promised bucket wasn't there, so I put a few of the early fish into the landing net and dropped them into '2' as I went along. Pete arrived with a bucket once I was eight or so to the good, although for some reason Pete didn't contact any tench at all. About a score got moved over and one solid fish of over a pound went back. Midday, the tench bites tailed off, the usual slump but rudd kept appearing to brighten things up, plus the kingfisher obligingly perched opposite, probably at the limit of the camera zoom but still.

The Wetland, pond 3View to the left The Wetland, pond 3The mind bendingly green pitch The Wetland, pond 3View to the right
The Wetland, pond 3The fairly blue porcupine quill The Wetland, pond 3Most of the tincas The Wetland, pond 3A few of the rudd, which are doing rather well
The Wetland, pond 3Read..steady.. The Wetland, pond 3'How to suspend a sprat', Part I.

Pete went on and I spent an hour or two trying to extract a pike from '6' and '7' but this for the most part involved watching an unmoving float with a sprat under it, while no part involved catching a pike. Top day.

swivel...and...wait for it...swivel ;-)...(and back to the top of the page) swivel...and...wait for it...swivel :-) swivel...and...wait for it...swivel :-) swivel...and...wait for it...swivel :-) swivel...and...wait for it...swivel :-) swivel...and...wait for it...swivel :-) swivel...and...wait for it...swivel :-) swivel...and...wait for it...swivel :-) swivel...and...wait for it...swivel :-) swivel...and...wait for it...swivel :-) swivel...and...wait for it...swivel :-) swivel...and...wait for it...swivel :-) swivel...and...wait for it...swivel :-) swivel...and...wait for it...swivel :-) swivel...and...wait for it...swivel :-) swivel...and...wait for it...swivel :-) swivel...and...wait for it...swivel :-) swivel...and...wait for it...swivel :-) swivel...and...wait for it...swivel :-) swivel...and...wait for it...swivel :-)

In Summary


There are 25 diary entries above. This page might very occasionally produce a result with less than 25 entries, as the page's 'engine' takes a fixed number of files and then removes the non-fishing ones, so the remainder could theoretically be less than 25. The odds of this actually happening are somewhere in the region of 1 in 1×1032. If this number (25) is less than 25, screen-shot it. You have more chance of winning the lottery than that happening. I might fix this theoretical possiblity later, I might not.

Bonk the 'refresh' button on your browser for more random diary entries.

In the ongoing spirit of the 'Lucky Dip' here is a random rfqNot 'random' in the true sense of the word, but a random pick from a selection of fishing related quotes that I quite like.  fishing quote:

"All the romance of trout fishing exists in the mind of the angler and is in no way shared by the fish." ~~ Harold F. Blaisdell, The Philosophical Fisherman, 1969 ~~ 

A bunch of hooks I found in my pike-boxA bunch of hooks found in my pike box...(and back to the top of the page) A bunch of hooks I found in my pike-boxA bunch of hooks found in my pike box A bunch of hooks I found in my pike-boxA bunch of hooks found in my pike box A bunch of hooks I found in my pike-boxA bunch of hooks found in my pike box
JAA